File server for users

I have created the folders for the users in NAS, and sharing them for the users and applying permissions.

Just thinking, NAS server is part of the domain, so I can view the domain users and apply folder permissions. Is there any need that I install active directory in the NAS also and make it Addition domain controller.

Secontly, I have moved the users folders from old computers to NAS, now when I share the folder for particular user containing data and apply quota for that user, the quota entries says space used 0 KB and space available 1 GB, but the user folder already contain data......

What to do in this regard.....

Is there any better way of providing storage to the users using NAS....
shifka_75Asked:
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tanelornConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Hi,

<<Is there any need that I install active directory in the NAS also and make it Addition domain controller. >>

none that I can think of...  as long as you have a stable DC and optionally a backup DC (or a good recovery plan.)
will a nas device act as a domain controller???

<< the quota entries says space used 0 KB and space available 1 GB, but the user folder already contain data>>

I had a similar situation.   it has to do with the file's and folder's "Owner"..  when you moved the data from the old to the NAS that data has the user that you used to copy it as the "Owner"  

one way around is to have the user take ownership of thier files..  this should make the quota report correctly.

Tanelorn
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Lee W, MVPConnect With a Mentor Technology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
No NAS device I'm aware of acts as a domain controller for either a Windows NT or Active Directory domain.  And conceptually it shouldn't - NAS is "Network Attached Storage" - if you wanted it to act as a domain controller then you wouldn't be using NAS, you'd have a file server that was also a domain controller.

In my opinion, you should always have at least 2 DCs so that should one fail, your users can still access network resources.  As long as you have 2, I wouldn't worry about  things - unless you have mulitple sites or more than a few thousand users.

As for the quota info, what tanelorn said is accurate.  Windows Quota information is based on file ownership.  If you copied/moved the files as an Admin, then the Admin now owns the files - the user may still have appropriate permissions, but he/she doesn't own the files.

Since things are already moved, you can a few things to rectify the ownership problem:

1. Modify and run the cscript(s) discuessed here (http://www.winnetmag.com/Windows/Article/ArticleID/8748/8748.html) so that the owner information is changed.  I haven't fully read the article, but you might have to place this in the user's login script.
2.  Recopy the files using the NT4 resource kit utility SCOPY (with the /O and /S switches) - This will preserve owner information
3.  Recopy the files using XCOPY (under 2000, XP, or 2003), which will also preserve the file ownership info (run XCOPY /? for details - I usually end up using 3-6 switches - /O copies owner, but there are others you'll probably want to use as well)
4.  Either as yourself or instruct your users in how to take ownership of their entire home folder from the top level.
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izwizCommented:
You aren't supposed to be able to grant ownership on files under Windows (only take ownership for yourself), but you can using the utility below:
http://wwwthep.physik.uni-mainz.de/~frink/chown/readme.html

We have used this to good effect in some large scale data migrations. You might want to make sure that the NTFS permissions on the files/folders are correct too. XCACLS.exe from the resource kit is a good tool for this. Both of these are command line tools and therefore lend themselves well to being scripted if you have a large amount of data to move about.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Actually, with 2003 Server, you can grant ownership, if I remember the Demo from Microsoft correctly..
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exx1976Connect With a Mentor Commented:
izwiz (and leew) - with 2003, you CAN grant ownership right in the GUI.

With 2000, you CAN grant ownership, using SUBINACL from the support tools (or maybe the resource kit..  I forget), like this:


subinacl /noverbose /file \\<SERVER>\<SHARE>\<DIRECTORY> /setowner=<USERNAME>

HTH,
exx
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izwizCommented:
D'oh, I missed that one!

I'd had it drummed into me for ages that you could only take ownership under NT based OS's.
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