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Derived class with default function parameters: needs explanation please !

Posted on 2004-09-01
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Last Modified: 2010-04-01
Ah; hello !

This is a hardcore C++ question that I am hoping can be resolved by someone who can give me a solid explanation.

Please peruse this code:

class A
{
public:
    A() {}
    virtual int GetVal(int a = 1) { return a; }
};

class B : public A
{
public:
    B() {}
    virtual int GetVal(int b = 2) { return b; }
}

main()
{
    A *x = new B();
    int r = x->GetVal();
}

Confusion:  r is 1.  Now I know this, but would like solid explanation and clarification as to *why*.

Firstly we are dealing with pointers, so that allows run time binding, right ?  And we are creating a B object but assigning it to an A pointer.  So why is the output not 2 ?  Arghhhh !

TIA
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Question by:mrwad99
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5 Comments
 
LVL 86

Expert Comment

by:jkr
ID: 11957146
The default parameter's value is deducted from the pointer type (where else should the compiler get that info from?) - consider the following:

class I
{
public:
   virtual int GetVal(int a = 0) = 0;
};


class A : public I
{
public:
   A() {}
   virtual int GetVal(int a = 1) { return a; }
};

class B : public A
{
public:
   B() {}
   virtual int GetVal(int b = 2) { return b; }
}

main()
{
   I *x = new B();
   int r = x->GetVal();
}

'r' will be (in fact is) 0...
0
 
LVL 19

Author Comment

by:mrwad99
ID: 11957212
So you are saying that as a general rule, default parameters are resolved at compile time always ?

I have just tried the same without pointers and the default value is taken from the type being assigned *to*, in this case I.

I am still a little confused however as to why it is taking the default from I when it can clearly see that I want to make an B object...

0
 
LVL 86

Accepted Solution

by:
jkr earned 1000 total points
ID: 11957331
>> So you are saying that as a general rule, default parameters are resolved at compile time always ?

Yes. Functions have to be called with all their parameters, so offering 'default's is just a convenience feature of the language.
0
 
LVL 19

Author Comment

by:mrwad99
ID: 11957347
OK.  I guess I need to re-read about virtual functions and late binding then.

Thanks.
0
 
LVL 86

Expert Comment

by:jkr
ID: 11957384
No, in general, you would be right. I't's just that 'default parameter' thingy that messes things up here.
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