Go Premium for a chance to win a PS4. Enter to Win

x
?
Solved

Size of tmp directory

Posted on 2004-09-01
10
Medium Priority
?
489 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-27
How do I determine the size of the tmp directory?
0
Comment
Question by:lcor
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • +1
10 Comments
 
LVL 34

Expert Comment

by:PsiCop
ID: 11959984
Well, this does vary. If you have SunOS 4.x, your /tmp is whatever was allocated for that on disk, if it has its own slice, or whatever is available in / if it doesn't.

If you have Solaris v2.x, then if a slice was allocated, the size of /tmp is that slice, otherwise it'll use swap space for /tmp

You need to state things like the version of Solaris - we're Experts, not mindreaders.
0
 
LVL 38

Assisted Solution

by:yuzh
yuzh earned 1200 total points
ID: 11960140
This is a Solaris TA, I assume that you are using Solaris.
     Mounting swap as /tmp is pretty common there, it is the default installation.

The size of the swap space is depands what appliaction software is running on the box (the
requirements of the system's software applications).

But you should allocate at least as the SAME size of the RAM for your system, to enable to save a worst-case crash dump.

I would recommended 2.5 X RAM when you have a large HD, and 1.5 X RAM for small HD.

Have a look at the following page to learn more about Solaris swap space:
http://www.itworld.com/Comp/2378/swol-0496-perf/

http://www.alise.lv/ALISE/technolog.nsf/0/59136f9072dc58d8422569fa0057b095?OpenDocument
0
 
LVL 34

Expert Comment

by:PsiCop
ID: 11960722
Technically, SunOS v4.x was renamed Solaris v1.x :-)
0
Concerto's Cloud Advisory Services

Want to avoid the missteps to gaining all the benefits of the cloud? Learn more about the different assessment options from our Cloud Advisory team.

 

Author Comment

by:lcor
ID: 11972731
Oops, sorry, didn't think it mattered.

Solaris 5.9
0
 
LVL 34

Expert Comment

by:PsiCop
ID: 11973522
More information is ALWAYS better here on EE. We're Experts, but we're not mindreaders, and we can't look over your shoulder.
0
 
LVL 2

Accepted Solution

by:
stanford_16 earned 800 total points
ID: 11978442
Hey lcor,

You can switch to the directory and type "du -sh"

# cd /tmp
# du -sh

Take care!
A
0
 
LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:stanford_16
ID: 11978448
To clarify:

To determine the available size of the /tmp directory, type "df -h".  To determine the size of all files currently in /tmp, type "du -sh".

Take care,
A
0
 
LVL 38

Assisted Solution

by:yuzh
yuzh earned 1200 total points
ID: 11978648
If you want to know how much disk space should be configured for
tmp/swap, have a look at my comment (http:#11960140)

If you only want to know the current usage of tmp, type in:

df -k

The output is dynamic, because it is depends on the status of the
current runing processes!
0
 
LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:stanford_16
ID: 11983039
lcor,

Have we answered your question?  If not, please give us more information in order to clarify, otherwise please accept an answer and close the question.

Thanks,
A
0
 

Author Comment

by:lcor
ID: 12000108
A,

Sorry for not getting back sooner.  Thanks  for your help.  It's just what I need.

lcor
0

Featured Post

Industry Leaders: We Want Your Opinion!

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

In tuning file systems on the Solaris Operating System, changing some parameters of a file system usually destroys the data on it. For instance, changing the cache segment block size in the volume of a T3 requires that you delete the existing volu…
I have been running these systems for a few years now and I am just very happy with them.   I just wanted to share the manual that I have created for upgrades and other things.  Oooh yes! FreeBSD makes me happy (as a server), no maintenance and I al…
Learn several ways to interact with files and get file information from the bash shell. ls lists the contents of a directory: Using the -a flag displays hidden files: Using the -l flag formats the output in a long list: The file command gives us mor…
Learn how to navigate the file tree with the shell. Use pwd to print the current working directory: Use ls to list a directory's contents: Use cd to change to a new directory: Use wildcards instead of typing out long directory names: Use ../ to move…
Suggested Courses
Course of the Month11 days, 18 hours left to enroll

916 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question