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Size of tmp directory

Posted on 2004-09-01
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Last Modified: 2013-12-27
How do I determine the size of the tmp directory?
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Question by:lcor
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Expert Comment

by:PsiCop
ID: 11959984
Well, this does vary. If you have SunOS 4.x, your /tmp is whatever was allocated for that on disk, if it has its own slice, or whatever is available in / if it doesn't.

If you have Solaris v2.x, then if a slice was allocated, the size of /tmp is that slice, otherwise it'll use swap space for /tmp

You need to state things like the version of Solaris - we're Experts, not mindreaders.
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by:yuzh
yuzh earned 300 total points
ID: 11960140
This is a Solaris TA, I assume that you are using Solaris.
     Mounting swap as /tmp is pretty common there, it is the default installation.

The size of the swap space is depands what appliaction software is running on the box (the
requirements of the system's software applications).

But you should allocate at least as the SAME size of the RAM for your system, to enable to save a worst-case crash dump.

I would recommended 2.5 X RAM when you have a large HD, and 1.5 X RAM for small HD.

Have a look at the following page to learn more about Solaris swap space:
http://www.itworld.com/Comp/2378/swol-0496-perf/

http://www.alise.lv/ALISE/technolog.nsf/0/59136f9072dc58d8422569fa0057b095?OpenDocument
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Expert Comment

by:PsiCop
ID: 11960722
Technically, SunOS v4.x was renamed Solaris v1.x :-)
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Author Comment

by:lcor
ID: 11972731
Oops, sorry, didn't think it mattered.

Solaris 5.9
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Expert Comment

by:PsiCop
ID: 11973522
More information is ALWAYS better here on EE. We're Experts, but we're not mindreaders, and we can't look over your shoulder.
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stanford_16 earned 200 total points
ID: 11978442
Hey lcor,

You can switch to the directory and type "du -sh"

# cd /tmp
# du -sh

Take care!
A
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by:stanford_16
ID: 11978448
To clarify:

To determine the available size of the /tmp directory, type "df -h".  To determine the size of all files currently in /tmp, type "du -sh".

Take care,
A
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Assisted Solution

by:yuzh
yuzh earned 300 total points
ID: 11978648
If you want to know how much disk space should be configured for
tmp/swap, have a look at my comment (http:#11960140)

If you only want to know the current usage of tmp, type in:

df -k

The output is dynamic, because it is depends on the status of the
current runing processes!
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Expert Comment

by:stanford_16
ID: 11983039
lcor,

Have we answered your question?  If not, please give us more information in order to clarify, otherwise please accept an answer and close the question.

Thanks,
A
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Author Comment

by:lcor
ID: 12000108
A,

Sorry for not getting back sooner.  Thanks  for your help.  It's just what I need.

lcor
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