Can I use the same server for both http and https requests?

Hello.

I am putting together a web-based application that is very resource-intensive.  I am using Linux/Apache/PERL etc.

I have three IP addresses at my disposal.  I was told that it would slow things down significantly to use the same server for both http and https requests.

Is this true, and if so, why?

Thanks!
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hankknightAsked:
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R-U-BnConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Indeed, they wont have an effect on eachother (http<->https), but things will run a very small bit slower on a decent server (if your encryption key length is not too big!).
If you use a 4 byte encryption key length for your https for example (and the strongest protocol), you will actually "see" a slow down on your server (mostly because of next point, but on an average small business server also at the server side).  When the user has a poor machine, the requests will come slower from your users since his machine too has to encrypt packages.
In the best case (non-default, fast protocol / small key / very good server), you'll always have the problem with your users' PCs speed.

Of course, the big question is, what's an average small business server and is it important for your users (the ones with slow PCs) not to have a little frustration of (small) waiting times.

I think you'd better make a littles dynamic script (php, asp, cf, ..) of 5k, count the time from request to display (on the server itself), multiply it by your amount of users, etc.. .. to decide wether your server is strong enough.

Or just try it and transfer everything when it becomes obviously slower.
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OliWarnerConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Yes, you can!
Https is just another server running on another port!

I've not noticed any slow down on my servers :0)
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EricConnect With a Mentor Commented:
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OliWarnerConnect With a Mentor Commented:
the comparisons dont show releveant information here... yes sure transfer rates on HTTPS are going to be slower, because they have to be encrypted, but when running a HTTPS and a HTTP server on the same machine, they're not going to affect each other's speed unless there is severly high CPU usage...

Depending on the strength of your server if you're expecting more than 150 concurrent users on each type of server (or 250/50 - somewhere around a mixed 300 people) then it might be a better idea to split the servers onto different boxes but if your server is a quad xeon with 16gigs of ram, you should have a problem until you hit ~1k users
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