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ODBC Linked Table Problem

Posted on 2004-09-03
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Last Modified: 2008-02-01
I have an Access Database that has a linked table to an ODBC data source.  The table has a field called RTCOST which is a Decimal field with a Precision of 9 and a Scale of 3, Decimal Places are set to Auto.

I can list the contents of the table but If I try to create a Make table query i.e take the contents of the linked table and dump it into an Access local table I get a Access error message which says : The decimal fields precision is too small to accept the numeric you attempted to add.

I've told the company who administer the database where the linked table comes from but they insist its correct.

Can anyone suggest a workaround
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Question by:Northumberland
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by:Navicerts
ID: 11972263
Linking it to FoxPro?
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by:Gustav Brock
ID: 11972399
Create the table first using currency as data type for the decimal field.
The run an append query.

/gustav
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by:Jim Horn
ID: 11975312
Access chokes on Decimal field types constantly.  The only workaround I can think of would be to reformat the field to something other than Decimal (Double?), then link tables.

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PendragonZero earned 500 total points
ID: 11975316
read it from the table as a string and convert it back to decimal
use this CDbl(Cstr([RTCOST]))
pen
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