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connecting xp to netware 3.12

Posted on 2004-09-03
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Last Modified: 2009-01-05
I need a simple set of instructions ( cheat sheet ) on how to connect a windows xp pro(sp1) machine to a netware 3.12 server ( F: ) drive.  I have data that I need to transfer from the windows machine to folders located on the shared ( F: ) drive of the server.

I have downloaded the client for netware [ c483sp2e.exe] and installed it.  

I need to know to check 3.12 to insure it is setup properly, what information about the 3.12 configuration I need to have available, and what settings I need to choose in xp to make these machines talk.

I know the 3.12 server has only 1 group ( everyone ), the ( F: ) drive is mapped to the [ sys ] volume, and the folders I need to transfer existing data to, are located on the [ F: ] drive.

I know the user login name for logging into the server from a windows machine

                                       I  NEED  TO   KNOW

1.  what settings are required on the server, and how do I get to the proper screens to check these settings.

2.  what setting are required on the xp machine, and how do I get to the proper windows to check these settings.
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Question by:hterry30309
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by:PsiCop
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OK, don't you think its a little silly to be connecting the latest rev of a client OS to a server OS that's over 10 YEARS old? You need to being your network environment up to a version of NetWare from THIS century.

Hopefully, when you installed Client 32, you did NOT do a "Standard" install. Your version of NetWare is ANCIENT; it was EOLed YEARS ago. The "standard" install of Client 32 is not geared towards it.

If you did a Standard install, then uninstall it and start over. Do a "Custom" install this time. Select IPX ONLY; NetWare v3.12 is so old it doesn't support IP for NCP. Also, select the Bindery authentication option, not NDS. Same thing, NetWare v3.12 is so old.

Of course, you need to have IPX loaded on the XP machine to begin with. I think the Client 32 install will do this for you if you don't already have it.

There's nothing you need to do on the server, except perhaps verify the Frame Type (use the "PROTOCOLS" command at the console prompt). In the Ethernet (you didn't bother to specify a topology) environment, I seem to recall (its been years) that v3.12 defaulted to 802.3 framing for IPX. Go to your workstation's network properties and FORCE its framing type for IPX to 802.3 - don't allow it to auto-detect/choose, Windoze is too stupid to get it right.

Should work at this point.
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I think 3.12 was the first to go for 802.2 as the default frame type.  3.11 and before definitely were 802.3  The only reason I had 802.3 (as well as 802.2) on my 3.12 server way back when was because I had a few old Intel NetPort print servers that didn't do 802.2.  We threw them away when we migrated to 4.11 because they didn't do NDS.

You should also check the IPX network number on the server, and set your IPX protocol properties to match.  Don't change the internal Ethernet number from all zeros, but IIRC, once you change to a specific frame type, the stupid IPX protocol stack from Microsoft turns off autodetect for network number as well, so you'll need to specify that, too.
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by:hterry30309
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Thanks guys, but I already solved the problem.  I had simply neglected to install the service pack which extracted as a seperate file from the client when I executed the download.  After uninstalling the client for the 3rd time, I noticed the other "install" file for the service pack during my third client install.  After installing the client ( AND service pack ) I was able to browse the network and find the 3.12 server.  Then, after fiddling around for about another 15 minutes, using different combinations of  windows and netware user names, I was able to actually get permissions to map an [F:] drive on the XP machine to the [F:} drive on the 3.12 server.  

SOLUTION:

It was not necessary to set the preferred protocol to [IPX only],  because the {default} [IP] setting includes 2 line items ( IP and IPX ).  I guess XP Pro is a little different from XP Home.   The IPX number on the network should NOT be matched in windows.  The only way I could get it to work was by setting the (windows) number to ALL zero's (00000000).  My ( .ncf) file is setup to load both 802.2 and 802.3 frame types to the 3COM (3C90X) NIC, but I did set the frame type to 802.3 in XP because the other stations are DOS/Netware client terminals, which use 802.3.  I also found that in the DHCP settings of the Netware Client, the [User Server] box had to be checked, The [Login Server] had to be changed from {none} to {default}, and the [binary data] box had to be checked.  

As for updating the server, thats not my decision,  it was hard enough getting the owners to upgrade to 3.12 from personal netware (Netware Lite).  I would have preferred to have gone with Windows Server 2003 Enterprise Edition, but the relevant application which nesessitates the network needs DOS as an underlying OS.

This was my first time connecting XP to netware, I learned a lot in the process.
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by:ShineOn
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I guess I was unclear.  In IPX there are two things called "network number."  There is the actual IPX network number, which in 3.12 is assigned via the BIND command to the network interface on the server.  There is also the INTERNAL "network" number, that  uniquely identifies the server as a server on the IPX network.

In the WinXP IPX protocol settings there are 2 spots in the IPX properties that mention IPX number.  The upper one is the local/internal network number.  That should not be changed - it should be left as all zeros, because the WinXP box is not acting as a server on the IPX network.

When you select your frame type, then you also have to indicate the IPX *NETWORK* number (which is different from the INTERNAL network number.)  That should match the IPX *NETWORK* number of the server's bound IPX interface (NOT the INTERNAL IPX network number of the server.)

It is possible for it to "work" using the defaults, but it CAN be flaky, which is why we recommended not leaving the IPX stack set for autodetedt.

It is entirely unneccesary, and can cause other connectivity problems, if you bind both IP and IPX to the Novell Client32.  Even if you leave IP on the WinXP box, it is useless for communication to the NetWare server and can cause the client to become "confused."  Therefore you should, as soon as is opportune, unbind IP from the Client32 setup on your client's XP pc's.
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by:ShineOn
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Also, if you feel that your solution, independently arrived at, is your answer to this question, I would prefer that you close this question by asking for a delete/refund or paq/refund from Community Support (it's a zero-point question) rather than get a "C" grade.  Not presuming to speak for PsiCop, but based on having worked with him for over a year in this forum, I'd guess that he'd prefer to have the Q PAQ-ed or deleted with refund rather than having a "C" grade on his record as well.

If you would be so kind as to post a question in Community Support (with a link to this question) the moderators will handle fixing this.  The quickest way to Community Support is by taking the "support" link in the upper right area of the page.

You should also review question closing/grading guidelines.

Thanks.
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by:ShineOn
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You also should drop 802.3 and go with the newer 802.2, in my opinion.  It's a waste of network bandwidth and server cycles to have both frame types broadcasting off the same server NIC if you don't need both frame types.  If you bind both 802.2 and 802.3 on a server, they have to be on separate IPX networks, which means twice as much SAP traffic on the LAN.
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by:ShineOn
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AND, if the client was happy with NetWare 2.x and had to be persuaded to go with 3.12, then shame on you for even thinking of putting them on Win2K3 Enterprise.  Even if it made any sense to the client to switch to Windows on the back end (which it obviously did not) I would think it unethical to push them to the much more expensive and resource-sucking Win2K3 Enterprise, when you probably would have met their needs with Win2K Standard on a uniprocessor box in legacy domain mode with the useless 75% of the default services turned off.
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by:PsiCop
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Like ShineOn, I think a PAQ/Refund would be a better way to deal with this Question. You get your points back, the solution remains in the database for someone else.

And like ShineOn, I can't imagine why you would migration them to Windoze. NetWare v6.5 ships with Apache, Tomcat, Perl, PHP, MySQL. Get the Small Business package (NetWare SBS v6.5) and it adds GroupWise and ZENworks. What possible motivation could there be to migrate them to Windoze, unless you're looking to insure yourself a steady supply of callbacks every time some 16-year-old twerp in Germany brings their network to its knees.
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