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Question regarding TCP/IP (stupid question)

Ok, I know TCP/IP is the set of protocols used to communicate within ethernet LANs.  
I'm assuming Token Ring and FDDI LAN Topologies also use TCP/IP?

When is TCP/IP NOT used (WAN?), or rather....what are some comparable protocol suites to TCP/IP that are used?

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dissolved
Asked:
dissolved
2 Solutions
 
rtptucksCommented:
Hey

There are some great guides here which will help you ..
http://www.techfest.com/networking/prot.htm
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povereemCommented:
Fiber
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mikebernhardtCommented:
Token Ring, FDDI, Ethernet, Frame Relay, etc. are Layer 2 framing protocols. IP is Layer 3. So an equivalent to IP would be IPX or AppleTalk. Any of the latter network protocols can run over any of the former framing protocols.
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dissolvedAuthor Commented:
ok, I think I understand. Anything above layer 2 does not matter because it can be framed for whatever topology (fddi, token ring, ethernet etc).

So let me ask one more thing.  802.3 is ethernet correct?  Is Ethernet II an updated 802.3?  If so, what is the difference? I had read that 802.2 can not identify uper layer protocols by itself. So it uses SNAP to do this? Is that correct?

Did Ethernet II allow 802.3 to identify upper layers without SNAP ?
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mikebernhardtCommented:
802.3 is the IEEE standard for Ethernet. In Ethernet 2 has also been called DIX because it was created by a consortium of DEC, Intel and Xerox. IEEE doesn't like using privately created standards much, so they modified it a little and made it their standard.

In Ethernet II there is a type field. This where the layer 3 protocol is identified. In 802.3, they replaced the same field with Length, which is the length of the the packet. They created SNAP, into which the type field goes. You can always tell them apart in this way: If the Length/Type field is less than 1500, it's 802.3 and the type will be found in the SNAP area. If it's more than 1500 it's the type.

Check out this great link all about it:
http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/Vista/8672/network/ethernet.html#A18
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dissolvedAuthor Commented:
ok, so ethernet II has a type field to identify the above layer

IEEE 802.3 is standardized and uses SNAP field to identify the above layer.
Where does LLC come in to play with 802.3? That is the only thing I'm confused on now

Thanks Mike, great explanation.
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mikebernhardtCommented:
Check out the link, it's in there too!
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