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Using Alternative Port than 6969 for Bittorrent

Posted on 2004-09-05
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Hi I live in an apartment complex that provides internet access but blocks port 6969 to prevent usage of Bittorrent. Is there any way around this via a proxy of some sort? Are their options using a 3rd computer outside the firewall to rerout the port somehow? Thanks

Jeff
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Question by:zooplibob
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scampgb earned 500 total points
ID: 11984230
Hi zooplibob,

I've been reading a little about this, and the best source of info I can find is at : http://dessent.net/btfaq/#ports

The most relevant bit being:
"Prior to version 3.2, BitTorrent by default uses ports in the range of 6881-6889. As of 3.2 and later, the range has been extended to 6881-6999. (These are all TCP ports, BitTorrent does not use UDP.) The client starts with the lowest port in the range and sequentially tries higher ports until it can find one to which it can bind. This means that the first client you open will bind to 6881, the next to 6882, etc. Therefore, you only really need to open as many ports as simultaneous BitTorrent clients you would ever have open. For most people it's sufficient to open 6881-6889.

The port range that BitTorrent uses is configurable, see the section on command line parameters, specifically the --minport and --maxport parameters.

The trackers to which BitTorrent must connect usually are on port 6969, so the client must have outbound access on this port. Some trackers are on other ports, however."


So, it looks like you can configure the TCP ports you need for data transfer, but you're likely to need port 6969 to connect to a tracker.
It says that some trackers may run on an alternate port, but I think you're going to have a hard time finding them.


On your second point "Are their options using a 3rd computer outside the firewall to rerout the port somehow?", yes there are.
This called port-forwarding or tunnelling.

http://www.sureshotsoftware.com/tcptunnel/  would seem to do the trick for you, however I'm sure there's loads of other applications that would do the same job.  

You'll need to have an external PC to run it on.

Does that help?
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by:zooplibob
ID: 11993875
Hi scampgb, thanks for the info. Can you elaborate on the second point more? Would port-forwarding or tunnelling allow me to use bittorrent at this apartment? I want to be able to download the files directly from here, and just use that external computer to get around these port restrictions without much data transfer. Is this possible? Thanks,

Jeff
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by:PennGwyn
ID: 11998816
On our network, BitTorrent is a policy violation.  It has users appropriate some of our bandwidth and place it at the service of third parties who are not bound by our terms of service (many of which are inherited from our provider and beyond our control).

If the complex is blocking this port, it may be because they have a similar issue.  If that's the case, assisting you to bypass their measures would violate EE rules.

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by:zooplibob
ID: 12002352
No this is not the reason they are blocking the port. They didnt have the capabilities to support the entire complex using bittorrent, so they just took the lazy approach to block the port for everyone. Answering this question would not violate EE rules.
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by:scampgb
ID: 12035157
zooplibob: to answer your question about tunnelling, no - all of the traffic would go via the external machine.

PennGwyn: I think you have a point about this question.  So, on balance, the "correct" answer would be - speak to the people who administrate the connection and ask them to allow you to use BitTorrent :-)
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by:scampgb
ID: 12638717
Thanks TheLearnedOne / CetusMOD

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