• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 208
  • Last Modified:

problem formatting networked secondary hard drive

I had 2 hard drives in my machine, both connected to my LAN, when i got a new hard drive i transfered all the data to that from the second hard drive as i need to use that for another machine, it was still connected to the network and had some files left that wouldn't delete, i tried to do a format on the new machine but it said cannot format a network drive, so i connected back to my machine and did a format from windows, however when it was nearly done it hanged and wouldn't move any further, it also was making strange noises, i restarted the machine and now it wouldn't even detect it! and took ages to even detect my primary drive!, i put back the new drive and everything was fine, i tried the format again in the other machine and the same error, although this time it had problems reading the drive, i hope i haven't broken it, don't see i could have though? can anyone help me fix this problem?
0
zar786
Asked:
zar786
1 Solution
 
zixpCommented:
Its kind of hard to follow, but maybe you could try opening it in partition-magic, and checking the drive's structure.  See if there are any problems there, and if not, try to clear it with the program instead of windows.  Otherwise, you should create a DOS boot disk, and run the 'fdisk' command, which will give you the option to format the drive (must be on local machine)
0
 
WakeupCommented:
If the hard drive is taking a long time to detect, or causing other drives in your system to take longer to detect or to even detect at all (at bios or on first bootup, or even w/in windows) it may be dying.  
Find out what brand drive it is, and most Hard drive manufacturers have diagnostic tools that you can run on the drive to see if their are any defects or problems with the drive.

www.maxtor.com
www.fujitsu.com
www.wdc.com
www.seagate.com
www.samsung.com
www.hgst.com
0
 
Blue_RishiCommented:
strange noises + not detected by bios = dying drive (both have nothing to do with file structure, so reformatting or deleting partitions won't help here...)

since you backed up all data, I suggest you throw it out. And no, you didn't kill your drive, although disk-intensive operations like formatting and coping drive contents CAN push drives over the ege, it was probably just it's time :-(

Blue Rishi
0
SMB Security Just Got a Layer Stronger

WatchGuard acquires Percipient Networks to extend protection to the DNS layer, further increasing the value of Total Security Suite.  Learn more about what this means for you and how you can improve your security with WatchGuard today!

 
mcp_jonCommented:
Looks to me like your drive has just expired, however, you can try to get the Disk Vendor utility and try to perform a low-level format and repair it, or not! Never the less try out this option.

Place the BIOS in auto-detect mode, with dma turned off.

Best Regards.
0
 
chuckatoscCommented:
If/When you get a drive to replace it, make sure it's well ventilated.  I had a drive die on me because I had it mounted to close to another one and it overheated.
0
 
WakeupCommented:
hmmm....thought I said it was a dying drive....oh well...
0

Featured Post

Industry Leaders: We Want Your Opinion!

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now