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installing fedora on winxp laptop

Posted on 2004-09-05
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hi

i have a toshiba loptop and i would like to install fedora core on my laptop
existing system is win xp

i have all  the fedora core disks but

how do i insatall so i could have both operating systems on one laptop linux fedora and win xp

i would also like to run tomcat on that computer

please help

thanks

i have a 50 gb drive


please help
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Question by:zgeorge_2
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rfennimore earned 160 total points
ID: 11986224
First, you should get a software package such as Partition Magic so you can repartition your drive to make room for Linux. There are a few open source (free) ones out there, but I use Partition Magic. Before you set up new partitions, make sure you defrag your drive first.

Personally, I have one NTFS partition for my Windows XP. I then have a "Common" FAT32 partition that can be accessed by both Windows and Linux so I can share files between the two OS's. I then just left the free space for the Fedora install.

Once you run the Fedora install, simply tell it to use the free space. Accept the defaults in terms of where the boot loader (GRUB) could be located. It will automatically recognize your Windows partition, although it might label it as "DOS". You can always go in an rename it to Windows XP if you like.

- Rick

PS: You might want to download a "Live CD" like Knoppix to test your Laptop to see if all of the hardware gets recognized. I have a Compaq Presario 900 Laptop. It took a little bit of tweaking to get everything to work in Fedora Core 2.
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by:paullamhkg
ID: 11986731
rfennimore gave you very good hints, you need space for install the fedora, use the partition magic, partition manager etc... to repartition your harddisk, and the very good point is create a FAT32 partition for common use, since access the linux partition from windows will be risky, even lots of tools can use, such as ext2fs http://www.ext2fs.com/ or explore2fs http://uranus.it.swin.edu.au/~jn/linux/explore2fs.htm.

after you have partition for fedora you have to have a boot manager to manage which O/S to boot, and GRUB is default boot manager of Fedora, here is some info about how to install win2k/winXP with linux http://www.geocities.com/epark/linux/grub-w2k-HOWTO.html, you can also use the NT boot loader to manage here is some info you can read http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Linux+NT-Loader.html.

After you have linux installed you can install any linux application/software/database etc... into it, provided that you have enough space.

Using the Knoppix to test your notebook/Laptop is a good tools as rfennimore suggested, Knoppix is a linux on a CD you no need to install anything into your computer, just run the CD and the Knoppix will detect the hardware for you and tell you which driver need. but most of the hardware can run on new kernel 2.6x like Fedora Core 2 have.

Hope this info can help :)
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by:rfennimore
ID: 11986758
Just a few notes:

Dual boot systems should be setup with Windows installed first, and Linux second. When you install Fedora, it installs it's own boot loader called GRUB (Grand Unified Boot Loader). I would not mess around with any other 3rd party boot loaders if I were you. Just let GRUB do it's thing. It works just fine, and will have no problems booting Windows as well.

- Rick

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by:paullamhkg
ID: 11987706
well nt boot loader is not that bad at all, it will not mess around, I did try before with my testing computer which boot both OS without any problem.
anyway, to use which boot loader is your own choice, I'm just give out some more options. :)
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by:rfennimore
ID: 11990185
Be that as it may, from the original question it would appear that zgeorge_2 is perhaps a "newbie" with Linux. I would not recommend using anything other than the default GRUB for a "newbie". To do otherwise would be just asking for trouble (IMHO).

- Rick
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by:kmcgonigal
ID: 11993431
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by:rfennimore
ID: 11993587
Well .... there are easier ways to accomplish this without having to read a 33 chapter HOWTO on Multi Disk System Tuning! :)

If the original poster, zgeorge_2, would like to update us on his progress here, we could offer some more useful info.

- Rick

PS: Make sure you backup ALL important data files before you do anything!
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by:rfennimore
ID: 11993612
Here is some useful patitioning info to get you started:

http://mlf.linux.rulez.org/mlf/ezaz/ntfsresize.html

There are a few Linux distro's that resize the partition for you during the install, but I have not used them myself. You might want to consider just starting with a blank disk and doing what I said in the first post. Using a boot floppy, use Fdisk.exe and create one NTFS partition for Windows XP, one blank FAT32 partition for all common files to be used by both operating systems, and leave the rest blank. Install XP first, then install Linux using the blank hard drive space.

It could look like this (example):

NTFS=    20GB
FAT32=  10GB
Blank=    20GB

- Rick
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