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Relationships, Shell Script, Different Flavors, Linux Classification

Posted on 2004-09-05
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Ok.. I am not a Unix Expert by here's a few questions I need help to understand, can anyone help?

1) What is relationship between MS DOS and UNIX?
2) Under what circumstances would you write a shell script and under what circumstances would you write a program?
3)Which of the popular flavors, viz., HP-UX, Solaris, AIX would you consider to be a descendent of the (East Coast) Bell Labs' efforts and which would be considered a follow-up to the (West Coast)  Berkeley BSD version of UNIX?
4) Would classify Linux as West Coast (Berkeley) or as East Coast (Bell Labs)?
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Question by:eshoris
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by:jlevie
ID: 11986366
(1) None

(2) A shell script is best used for things that will be interacting heavily with other Unix commands. Another way of looking at that is to consider shell scripts as a means of automating what you'd do at the command line. Shell scripts aren't very suitable for things that need to do significant amounts of I/O or that are computationally intensive.

(3)&(4) Solaris may well be the Unix that's closest to the spirit & organization of SysV (AT&T), but it started out as based on BSD. In reality most of the modern Unixen/Linuxen are a mix of SysV & BSD concepts and tools, so there's not really a clear distinction any more except for things like OpenBSD & FreeBSD.
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Tintin earned 50 total points
ID: 11986462
These sound very much like homework questions, but I'll give you benefit of the doubt.

1) MS-DOS borrowed some ideas from Unix like the directory tree (although Bill Gates decided to use backslashes instead of forward slashes).

2)  A shell script can be considered a program.  It all depends on what your definition of a program.  If you mean a compiled program, then the reasons that jlevie gave is a good summary.

3&4)  Now this really does sound like a homework question.
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by:jlevie
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> MS-DOS borrowed some ideas from Unix like the directory tree

I've heard that said, but MS-DOS reminds me more of a Dec OS than Unix (than than the directory notation).
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by:Tintin
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by:Gns
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Yes, tghis realy smacks of homework, doesn't it. I'll answer 4 in a way...:-)

4) Neither. It's the South Coast (of Finland) where Linus was (Helsinki Uni) when he wrote Linux initially.;-)

-- Glenn
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by:Gns
ID: 11989044
Oh and Jim, though we nowadays live in the "post-merged-kernel-land" and "mixed-toolset-era" you can still "follow the paperwork" as to the ancestry of unices... In most cases that's what we call "the ongoing SCO trials":-):-).

-- Glenn
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by:eshoris
ID: 11998101
I am very new to Unix and some of these questions were discussed in class, I guess I'm trying to understand and see what the experts have to say to better comprehend the background and history.
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