Solved

Communication problem with serial interface on newer PCs

Posted on 2004-09-06
6
441 Views
Last Modified: 2012-06-21
I have a Karel MS48 Telephone System and  Karel CM48 V. 1.03 software to configure and manage it. The software is link to Switchborad system through Serial Interface and there is also a security plug on the parallel port (dongle).
The software runs under Windows 98 SE.
Everything has worked fine since, but recently after I changed the PC on which the software is installed I could not have a  serial connection working. The software is behaving like there is no connection between the PC and the switchboard via serial Interface.
The serial interface of the new PC is working condition and functional with other peripherals and software, and the configuration is correct, exactly like in the older machine.
Of course as soon I re install the software in the older machine, everything works ok.
It seems like the serial interface of the older PC behave differently from the serial interface of newer PCs.
When I say older PC I mean PC up to Pentium III (I was using a old machine to manage this switchboard) and usually equipped with two serial interface on motherboard.
The new PCs I tried are Intel Pentium IV and AMD processor machines (I tried various machines) equipped with only one serial port on mother board.
I would appreciate if someone could have any idea of this problem and if there is a solution to it.
I cannot have a new version of this software since Karel Corporation is not represented anymore in Tunisia, the country where I work.
0
Comment
Question by:Rorob154
6 Comments
 
LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:LimeSMJ
ID: 11988524
Did you check to see if the serial COM port settings (Baud rate, flow control, etc...) are the same?
0
 

Expert Comment

by:gmunden
ID: 11989117
What were the other peripherals you tested on the newer computer? It may be a BIOS setting, i.e. a Plug N Play issue that the older software doesn’t like. If so you should be able to turn off the setting for PNP OS in the BIOS, if that is the culprit. Short of that it should be working just fine, if not I would like to know what peripherals you could get to work and the port settings used.
0
 
LVL 31

Expert Comment

by:rid
ID: 11991132
Is the newer machine also running win 98? Newer windows versions may have trouble with software trying to use the hardware (ports) directly.

Did you check that the serial port on the new machine is set to the same I/O address and IRQ as the one that you used on the older PC?
/RID
0
 

Author Comment

by:Rorob154
ID: 12033449
Thank you for your help, but the connection still does not work.
Anyway I should accept  your answer also because the information I gave you were partially incomplete if not incorrect, but I do not know how to do this without closing the problem. Sorry.
In fact my assistant gave me information that were not exact and I realized it. when I tried your suggestions personally
Find here after the actual problem :
•      First, contrary to what I wrote last time, the security plug (dongle) is connected at the same serial port used to link the PC and the switchboard.
•      Second the error that I receive from the software is "No security plug". So at this point the software locks itself. Possibly the pure serial connection works.
•      Other peripherals that I connected to the same serial interface were a CipherLab Bar code reader and a thermal transfer printer Meto 40. They worked normally.
According your various suggestions I checked personally that all the serial parameters configuration were the same in the older and newer PCs (bauds, bits, stop bit, parity, control, irq, address). I have also tried to disable from bios the PnP options.  But the final result is the same : "No security Plug".
Since I was using the same OS (Windows 98SE), same software and same parameters, I thought that there is some difference in handling the serial protocol in new bios or chipset.
I have tried on machine using Windows XP and I got the same result.
Grateful for more suggestions
0
 
LVL 31

Accepted Solution

by:
rid earned 500 total points
ID: 12033515
Again, it may be a question about the I/O addresses of the serial ports. "Older" BIOS's (motherboards) used standard settings for the serial1 and serial2 (COM1 and COM2 in windows) ports, like I/O 2F8 and 3F8 and IRQ 4 and 3 respectively (values here subject to errors due to my bad memory...). Newer BIOS's seem to be more "flexible" in port resources assignment. The software may very well be looking for the dongle at a specific hardware address, which may or may not be the one you have attached the dongle to...

So, you could look into BIOS settings for the serial ports and make sure they use the legacy values. Also make sure there are no internal modems or infrared ports occupying resources that clash with serial ports that you need for this.

/RID
0

Featured Post

3 Use Cases for Connected Systems

Our Dev teams are like yours. They’re continually cranking out code for new features/bugs fixes, testing, deploying, testing some more, responding to production monitoring events and more. It’s complex. So, we thought you’d like to see what’s working for us.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

Title # Comments Views Activity
Home RAID setup 17 149
desktop pc occasionally wont boot up 10 76
Dell PC - retrieve files from hard drive - pc not bootable 10 85
Find power supply plug from picture.. 6 68
Skype is a P2P (Peer to Peer) instant messaging and VOIP (Voice over IP) service – as well as a whole lot more.
Along with being a a promotional video for my three-day Annielytics Dashboard Seminor, this Micro Tutorial is an intro to Google Analytics API data.
Although Jacob Bernoulli (1654-1705) has been credited as the creator of "Binomial Distribution Table", Gottfried Leibniz (1646-1716) did his dissertation on the subject in 1666; Leibniz you may recall is the co-inventor of "Calculus" and beat Isaac…

773 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question