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C# ActiveX DLL

Posted on 2004-09-08
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Last Modified: 2008-01-09
Could someone please help me with some example source code on how to write an ActiveX DLL in C#. I have an existing DLL written in VB 6.0 and I have a decent understanding of COM and COM+.

This DLL will only be called from classic ASP pages and it will be run on two dedicated COM+ servers.

All I need is a working sample with one or two methods.

The first method should make a connection to a MS SQL Server, run a simple select statement and write the results to the calling ASP page by using Response.Write.

In the VB DLL I use the ASPTypeLibrary Class to get access to the ASP Request, Response, Session, Server and Application objects. Is it possible to do the same in C#?
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Question by:hans_larson
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11 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:netjkus
ID: 12009503
I am not sure if you wanted to write an Active X component? I think you are trying to use C# code in asp.

But, basically in .NET - MS recommends to re-write the ActiveX code using C# components. Just handling a Connection to SQLServer need not be an activeX at all. You can create a standard Library to do this job.

to create a DLL , try this :
http://www.c-sharpcorner.com/2/pr12.asp

you can get most of the part done using the regular DLL. Unless you want to use some components that are done in Active X and you want to keep using them in C#, like Imaging etc., you donot need ActiveX in .net. You can write Unmanaged code if you are planning to use in non - .net applications. This will not help you use any of the .net features.
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Author Comment

by:hans_larson
ID: 12009788
netjkus:

My current environment is Classic ASP and the reason for wanting to move to C# is because the VB 6.0 ActiveX DLL is single-threaded and I need a multi-threaded DLL and figured I can do this is C#.

I know a little more about C# than I do about C++ so that's the motivation to use C# right there.

Look at:  http://www.codeproject.com/csharp/estransactions.asp

Esentialy this is what I need to do, but I also need to be able to access the ASP intrinsic objects from within C#. So an example of using the component described in the above URL that writes the recordset using the ASP Response object is what I need.

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LVL 4

Expert Comment

by:thedude112286
ID: 12020530
Just compile this as a dll.

[ClassInterface(ClassInterfaceType.AutoDual)] // the key to exposing a C# app as a ActiveX object
public class YourClass{
      // all your methods and stuff go here
}

Good info can be found at http://www.devhood.com/messages/message_view-2.aspx?thread_id=16569.
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LVL 3

Author Comment

by:hans_larson
ID: 12023333
thanks, now how to I use the ASP intrinsic objects in C#?

Example: How do I use Response.Write instead of using return?
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LVL 4

Expert Comment

by:thedude112286
ID: 12029944
Why not try this:

[ClassInterface(ClassInterfaceType.AutoDual)] // the key to exposing a C# app as a ActiveX object
public class YourClass{
      public string GetMsg() { return "Hello World"; }
}

And in asp:
Response.Write(YourClassObject.GetMsg())

Or is this not what you are talking about?
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LVL 3

Author Comment

by:hans_larson
ID: 12030953
That will work to just write the output for a single line of text. I could also get away with concatenating a really long string, but that will just kill performance.

I need to be able to access the ASP objects to use the Request and Session objects also.
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LVL 4

Expert Comment

by:thedude112286
ID: 12060187
[ClassInterface(ClassInterfaceType.AutoDual)] // the key to exposing a C# app as a ActiveX object
public class YourClass{
      HttpResponse Response;
      HttpRequest Request;
      HttpSessionState Session;

      public YourClass(HttpResponse response, HttpRequest request, HttpSessionState session) {
            Response = response;
            Request = request;
            Session = session;
      }

      public void GetMsg() {
            Response.Write("Hello World");
      }
}

See if this works
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Accepted Solution

by:
thedude112286 earned 125 total points
ID: 12060190
You would call the class in my last post like this:

YourClass c = new YourClass(Response, Request, Session);
c.GetMsg();
0
 
LVL 3

Author Comment

by:hans_larson
ID: 12060196
Thanks. I will try this and let you know if it works. Why do I need to call the class?

Can't I just call it from ASP using Server.CreateObject ?
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LVL 4

Expert Comment

by:thedude112286
ID: 12060961
That should work.  Treat it just as you would a normal COM object.
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