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Weird temperature problems on Socket 775 P4 3.0Ghz

Posted on 2004-09-08
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Last Modified: 2013-11-10
I just got a new Motherboard/Processor: The Asus P5GD2 Deluxe, and the socket 775 3.0ghz prescott. I set everything up, and after the POST, as soon as the Wondows XP splash screen began to fade on, the computer froze for about 3 seconds and the shut down. I could not turn it on for a minute. The I rebooted and watched the BIOS. In hardware monitor the cpu temp was 65C. This is when the computer is sitting in the BIOS. I tried a few more times, but I could not get into Windows. I beleive that it is because of overheating.

I went into the hardware monitor in the Asus BIOS, and watched the temps. After five minutes, idling, my cpu temp is 78.5C/173F. I checked my cpu fan, and it is working. I am using the stock HSF. I am using arctic silver that was properly applied ( after first having removed the "tape" that come with the tock cooler). I have no clue why my temps are so high, and I am assuming that my problem is because of the temps. Can anybody help?
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Question by:JCapper
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Expert Comment

by:joey_the_ass
ID: 12013328
Well the first thing to check is that the heat sink is properly installed.  Take it off and reseat it.  Also clean off all the arctic silver and when you reinstall it, use about half of a grain of rice sized amount.
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by:wparrott
wparrott earned 85 total points
ID: 12013436
JCapper,

You've definately got a thermal problem. 170 degrees is about 40-45 degrees above normal. Don't take offense but I have to ask:

1. Did you remove the load plate cover from the motherboard socket?

2. When you say you 'removed the tape' from the heat sink, do you mean you removed the thermal interface material from the bottom of the heatsink and replaced it with the artic silver?

3. You mentioned getting to the XP splash screen and it froze up. Were you able to successfully install XP prior to the heat problems you are having now?

If you answered yes to all the above questions, I'd say there's a problem with the CPU. Any chance you can get it replaced?

Hope this helps...
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by:nowaydown1
ID: 12013475
Good Day:

I would definately agree with the previous expert; try to reseat the heatsink.  Pay close attention to the direction of the heatsink when you mount it (it is possible to put some one way heatsinks on backwards which results in poor contact with the die of the cpu even though the heatsink is securely locked in place).  Generally, you'll note a heatsink that only mounts one direction by a raised edge on one side.  The side with the raised edge will face towards the fat end of the socket (nominally where it says Socket 775--this will be the same piece of plastic that the locking bar goes into)

Just another little something to watch for. =)

Also, check your BIOS settings for irregular fsb, multiplyer, voltage settings, etc.  Maybe somehow BIOS is feeding the cpu more juice than it can handle.

If all of that checks out, the next thing I would look at is your airflow.  It seems a bit unlikely that a hot ambient temp is getting you such excessive cpu temperatures, but it's not impossible.  Ensure your case has proper airflow, not only the cpu fan, but a way for air to be pulled THROUGH the case.  One case fan alone is probably doing you more harm than good (unless its a pretty high cfm fan).  

Just some things to take a look at.  Good luck!
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Gaud-wo earned 90 total points
ID: 12015545
Yeah, 78° is a bit too much. I'd blame Intel ^_^ Well not kidding in this case, intel is getting hotter and hotter lately - this used to be AMD's trademark! It's because AMD has released quite some new super performing (in some cases better than intel) with a much more price/prestation rate than ever before, Intel released some technologies way too soon - resulting in non-balanced temperatures.
Still, you should be able to fix this.

To clear this out first: so you removed the sticky goo on the bottom of the stock heatsink, took of all remnants with some kind of solvent (never touching it with your fingers), double checked its cleanliness, then applied AS really thin (like 2 eyedrops) smearing it out with a clean non-fat surface (your finger in a plastic bag/latex glove) over about 2 cm² (square inch)?

Then, as explained above, I'd check if the cooler isn't applied reverse to the base.
 
You can easily check the airflow in the system by monitoring case temperature (you should be able to see this in BIOS as well), if it raises quickly too with side-panel shut, then you've got an airflow problem.
Still, lack of flow can't cause a standard system to overheat just like that, the PSU sucks out hot air anyway...

Glenn
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Author Comment

by:JCapper
ID: 12015900
Ok, here goes:

wparrott: Yes, I removed the load plate cover. Yes, I mean the thermal interface material and replaced it with arctic silver. No I did not install XP. I had it installed previously, this was just an upgrade - and no, my problem is not that I need to do a clean reinstall - even if I left it in the BIOS it will shut down after a few minutes when it gets too hot.

Next, I have a Lian-Li PC-60 case, with two intake fans and one exhaust fan.

I've installed at least 5 Socket 370 or Socket A CPUs, and I know what you are referring to as far as mounting the HSF backwards - however, with the 775, I checked before I installed it, and apparently that is irrelevant. It sits differently, so it seems that can't be the problem.

Gaud-wo: Almost exactly. However, I did not smear it - it is not supposed to be smeared on the P4 with heat spreaders. I put about a half-grain of rice on the center of the heat spreader, and set the HSF on it. That is according to the Arctic Silver instructions.


I will have to try removing the HSF, cleaning it off, and reapplying it anyhow. Any tips on cleaning both it, and the processor, before I do it?
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Expert Comment

by:Callandor
ID: 12017154
Very odd that you have a temperature problem with a P4 - there is always the possibility that the sensor is wrong, and telling your system to shutdown for no good reason.  Did you physically touch the heatsink, to see if it really is that hot? (do this carefully, because 173F is burning hot!)

You can clean the cpu with a clean cloth and some rubbing alcohol.  Let it dry afterwards, which should be pretty fast.
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Expert Comment

by:Gaud-wo
ID: 12017517
Try to use a non-fuzzy cloth, and solvent like what the misses/girlfriend/mom uses to clean off her make-up works good too. As long as it is somewhat active against oil and grease.

I suppose you don't have too much material to do a comparative test? A mainboard with same socket or the old stock fan would do, so you can test what's wrong...
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Author Comment

by:JCapper
ID: 12019564
I'm assuming I can use a lint free cloth with some glasses cleaner sprayed on the cloth. It's basically alcohol. Or I could use rubbing alcohol.

I touched the top of the heatsink after turning the system on and letting it get till it is about to load the splash screen. The system then shuts down. I touched the top of the HSF and it was quite warm.

Don't have much to do a comparitive test with for a 775 board. If I was dealing with socket A i have some extras laying around, but no, unfortunately I can't compare.
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by:Gaud-wo
ID: 12022124
Hasn't the ASUS BIOS got any settings for CPU fan rpm? I know lately many mainboards have a smart rpm sensing and adjusting feature - maybe you can adjust fan RPM here, you can try the fastest setting and see if it fixes the problem?


Glenn
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by:JCapper
ID: 12022258
Its only spinning at ~2700 RPM - and thats as quick as its going.
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by:wparrott
ID: 12023262
I'd say at this point that you need to start eliminating components, namely the processor. How much trouble will it be for you to get the CPU RMA'd?
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by:JCapper
ID: 12023400
OK, I tried taking the HSF off and cleaning it and the P4, using isopropyl alcohol with q-tips. I've tried at least 4 times, using slight variation in the amount of arctic silver. No luck. In addition, Most times now it does not get past around 7 seconds before shutting down. I cant even get to the bios. First it kept shutting in middle of detecting drives on my add in IDE card. I took that out to be sure. It still shuts at 7 seconds.

I also felt the heatsink right after it shut down (after 7 seconds) and it was slightly warm, but not very hot. However, if the processor is heating up very quickly, or something (not that I can guess what it possibly is) is wrong with the HSF, I guess the HSF would not be extremely hot in 7 seconds.

I got the processor at zipzoomfly. Will they make problems?
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by:wparrott
ID: 12023727
Their policy looks like most other sites I've seen. I'd call them ASAP and get an RMA for a defective processor. Don't mention removing the OEM thermal tape from the heatsink. Just clean everything up real nice and package it up to send back.

Good luck...
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by:nowaydown1
ID: 12023887
I would definately agree.  Sounds like you have a bad piece of hardware there.  Sometimes it happens.  They shouldn't give you any troubles because the CPU still fires up.  They tend to be more touchy about it when there are burn marks on it and it's dead.  :)  --Noway
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