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Foreign characters

Posted on 2004-09-09
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Last Modified: 2013-12-03
I can type Russian, Hebrew etc into a JTextField and JTextArea and they display ok, but sending the strings over a socket seems to destroy them and they become question marks. What readers / writers / streams are best to use in this case?
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Question by:afterburner
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Expert Comment

by:objects
ID: 12014192
use a Writer and check the problem isn't with whats reading the data at the other end.
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Author Comment

by:afterburner
ID: 12014371
At the other end is always a buffered reader that reads the string. Or would the problem be in something else?
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Assisted Solution

by:objects
objects earned 80 total points
ID: 12014404
check the encoding being used
and is the oher end using a font that supports the characters being sent?
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Author Comment

by:afterburner
ID: 12014430
I tried sending the string as a string captured from the JTextField (JTextField.getTExt();), then tried it as a new String using UTF, UTF-8, UTF-16, UTF-16BE, UTF-16LE, etc., and none of these worked, although with 16BE I think it was, the displayed return string looked a bit more promising, as it was not simply question marks, but I guess this is neither here nor there.

As I am using loopback, yes, the 'other end' is also using a font that supports the charset.
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Al-Khwarizmi earned 320 total points
ID: 12014612
When you instance your BufferedReader, be sure to pass it a Reader object configured with the encoding you're used.

As in

myReader = new BufferedReader ( new InputStreamReader ( myInputStream , "UTF-16" ) );
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Expert Comment

by:CEHJ
ID: 12014655
>>and they become question marks

Where?
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Author Comment

by:afterburner
ID: 12014807
>> be sure to pass it a Reader object configured  ...

that sounds like a good idea - I will try that.

>> Where?  ...

in the displaying JTextArea which receives the returned string.
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Expert Comment

by:CEHJ
ID: 12014839
>>in the displaying JTextArea which receives the returned string.

That's OK then

>>that sounds like a good idea - I will try that.

Let us know if it doesn't work. Use UTF-8 unless you have a specific reason not to
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Author Comment

by:afterburner
ID: 12015006
>> Use UTF-8 unless you have a specific reason not to ...

Does the printerwriter *and* the reader have to be configured with the encoding?
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Expert Comment

by:Al-Khwarizmi
ID: 12015122
If you use a PrintWriter too, the situation is similar:

PrintWriter myPrintWriter = new PrintWriter ( new OutputStreamWriter ( myOutputStream , "UTF-16" ) );

would be a good match for the reader above, if the input and output streams are connected as is the case with a socket.
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Assisted Solution

by:CEHJ
CEHJ earned 100 total points
ID: 12015134
>>Does the printerwriter *and* the reader have to be configured with the encoding?

Readers/Writers have to match encoding-wise
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Author Comment

by:afterburner
ID: 12015308
OK, it will take me a little while to change things. Two small points meanwhile  - why do you mention UTF-8 and AL-Khwarizmi UTF-16 ? ; and secondly, will the encoding still allow the transport of ASCII chars as is the case with the existing Printwriter and Reader that I'm using?
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Expert Comment

by:CEHJ
ID: 12015336
>>why do you mention UTF-8

It's the most economical way of transmitting Unicode

>>will the encoding still allow the transport of ASCII chars as is the case with the existing Printwriter and Reader that I'm using?

Yes - 'ascii' is a subset of Unicode
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Author Comment

by:afterburner
ID: 12015961
That's it. Thanks 4 ur help(s).
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Expert Comment

by:CEHJ
ID: 12015979
8-)
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Expert Comment

by:Al-Khwarizmi
ID: 12015985
I only mentioned UTF-16 as an example, sorry if that confused you. UTF-8, as CEHJ says, is probably a better option in your case. UTF-16 is more suited for heavy use of Asian languages, where it can save space.

Although I don't think you need it, if you want to learn more about unicode formats you can check http://www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/library/utfencodingforms/index.html?dwzone=unicode
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Author Comment

by:afterburner
ID: 12016048
>> UTF-16 is more suited for heavy use of Asian languages ...

in fact, that is exactly where it comes in - but at least I know now, and appreciate your help v. much.
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Expert Comment

by:CEHJ
ID: 12019056
>>
UTF-8, as CEHJ says, is probably a better option in your case. UTF-16 is more suited for heavy use of Asian languages, where it can save space.
>>

Yes you're right. That comment of mine could have been quite misleading. I think it's better to say UTF-8 is more economical when there are mixed 'ascii' and higher characters
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Author Comment

by:afterburner
ID: 12019434
Tell me if I need to open another question for this, but I have been trying it now with Japanese and Korean, and all I get are little squares in the JTextArea and JTextFields. Would any of you have anything to say on that? It's these languages - plus Chinese  - that I need in particular.
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Expert Comment

by:objects
ID: 12022184
> and all I get are little squares in the JTextArea and JTextFields.

Are you using a font that supports the characters being used?
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Author Comment

by:afterburner
ID: 12022271
>> Are you using a font that supports the characters being used?


I am, because I can type Japanese into Word - although I admit I am not sure of the role of IME in this, and fear it may be some kind of a 'closed interface', just for M$ purposes, which Java can't share.

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Expert Comment

by:objects
ID: 12022334
Is the same process involved transferring the string, and if so what encoding are you using.
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Author Comment

by:afterburner
ID: 12022430
Yes, it is the same process exactly. I tried with UTF-8 first and it didnt work so I tried UTF-16LE for no good reason :) which of course didnt work either.
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Author Comment

by:afterburner
ID: 12022448
I think (but I am not sure) that I might have seen another choice apart from IME when installing the Asian support; if that's the case should I unistall IME and try another one?
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Author Comment

by:afterburner
ID: 12022467
Ah, sorry, my comment about using a Font that supports Jap may not be right exactly, since I might of course not be using the same one in Word as I am in the Java app JTextField. Should I check that or is it a red herring?
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Expert Comment

by:CEHJ
ID: 12028699
You need to do something like:

textField.setFont(new Font("Batang", Font.PLAIN, 12));
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