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Why does unplugging the network cable disconnect a drive mapped to a share defined on the server?

Posted on 2004-09-09
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Last Modified: 2012-05-05
V: is mapped on Server1 to \\Server1\Public

Sitting at Server1, I browse My Computer and open V:\.

I unplug the network cable and the window closes.

Any ideas why and how to allow the mapped drive connection without the network cable plugged in?


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Question by:averyb
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harleyjd earned 2000 total points
ID: 12017654
It's still using the network stack in order to access the folder, so the stack has gone down.

I'm not too sure how to get around this one. Why do you need it?

What about a loopback plug? RJ45 with Pins 1 and 2 cross connected to 3 and 6

What about a mini switch? just a old 10/100 switch to leave plugged in while you work "offline"

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by:averyb
ID: 12018599
Thanks for the explanation.

This is a demo machine that runs a fairly complex CORBA application.  

In production the client app connects to a mapped drive to get config settings and access to other stuff.

Wanted to keep the demo consistent with production.  First choice was to also have it connect to a mapped drive.  It can't stay connected to the network because the demo server would mess up the development servers.  The CORBA app is designed to self-discover other CORBA servers to share the workload.

Wanted to see if there was a quick an easy way to get aorund the problem.

Since all the files are on the demo server we'll just use an explicit path instead of a mapped drive.

Thanks again.

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by:harleyjd
ID: 12021932
ok, how about a subst command? That would create a virtual drive to a physical drive path...

like subst f: c:\database would put your database in an effictive f: drive
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by:averyb
ID: 12023637
That will work like a charm.  Not familar with that command, so thanks for mentioning it.

I'll ask another question about this to give you some points.
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by:harleyjd
ID: 12024034
No, don't do that. 2000 feels about right, as it wasn't that taxing...

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