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Find returns too many errors...

Posted on 2004-09-09
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Last Modified: 2010-08-05

When I try to find files on my system, I type:

find / -name "somename" -print

the problem is that when I do this, it not only finds all the filenames that I want, but it also searches through some directories which I do not have access to. So I get thousands of error messages like:

find: cannot chdir to </etc/security> : Permission denied
find: cannot chdir to </etc/ppp> : Permission denied
find: cannot chdir to </opt/lost+found> : Permission denied

and somewhere among these error messages, I can find my files but it takes too long...

Is there a way to only find what I need?

I tried piping to a 'grep 'somename' but that only moves the found files to the end of the error messages.

-- Bubba
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Question by:bganoush
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by:jlevie
ID: 12019670
Have you considered using 'slocate somefile' instead? It will only print out matches.
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chris_calabrese earned 125 total points
ID: 12019841
find / -name "somename" -print 2>/dev/null
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by:timf04
ID: 12025452
Run this:
find / -name "somename" -print 2>/dev/null

This will take all STDERR (2) and send it to /dev/null
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by:ahoffmann
ID: 12039588
> I can find my files but it takes too long...
start your find at the directory wher you expect the files, like
  find /path/where/expected -name "somename" -print 2
or you can do it the long way:
  find / \( -name dirwherepermissiondenied -prune -o -name otherdirwherepermissiondenied \) -name "somename" -print 2

> Is there a way to only find what I need?
hmm, either this is the wrong question: why are you using find then?
or the answer is simply:
  ls -l /path/where/I/expect/somename

I assume that both answers are not what you're expecting. Please rethink about this question and rephrase it.

> slocate somefile
this prerequests that the locate database has been setup correctly before.
The only reliable way is find :-)
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