Solved

do machines have to join the domain to see a shared folder?

Posted on 2004-09-09
10
246 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-11
I have outlying buildings that need to connect to the server at the main building and do I have to have them join the domain or can I just map a drive letter to that folder that they need.  What does it mean to join the domain?  I have a mental breakdown on this.
0
Comment
Question by:teachellen
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
10 Comments
 
LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:JBinRI
ID: 12022017

You do not need to join a domain to get access to the shared folder. However, you will be prompted to supply a valid user and password who has privileges to that share.

What does it mean to join the domain?

The domain is a set of network resources (applications, printers, and so forth) for a group of users. The user need only to log in to the domain to gain access to the resources, which may be located on a number of different servers in the network.

When you say "I have outlying buildings that need to connect to the server at the main building"

If these people need to use resources on the network it would be best to join the domain and set-up a group policy for them. If yoo don't you will run into many connectivity issues.

GL

0
 
LVL 95

Expert Comment

by:Lee W, MVP
ID: 12022056
JBinRI is generally correct - for NT based systems.  For 9x based systems, things are a little different, but in some respects easier as well.  Whhat are the clients running that need access to the server resources?
0
 

Author Comment

by:teachellen
ID: 12022750
The outlying buildings do not really need access to the domain controller other than that is where active directory is.  The server in the building is member server and does not have active directory.  The machines that are connecting are xp and the server is win2003.  Would I be creating havoc if I had active directory on the server in the building and that would keep them off of the domain controller.    I have one domain controll and one member server in each building.  I have one person to maintain everything.  There is no software that has to be shared, but maybe  a printer.  any suggestions would help.
thanks in advance
0
Windows Server 2016: All you need to know

Learn about Hyper-V features that increase functionality and usability of Microsoft Windows Server 2016. Also, throughout this eBook, you’ll find some basic PowerShell examples that will help you leverage the scripts in your environments!

 
LVL 95

Accepted Solution

by:
Lee W, MVP earned 25 total points
ID: 12022955
How many users?

I used to manage a network of 1000 users and computers with about 30 buildings on one campus and 4 remote sites between .5 miles and 5 miles away.  We handled the active directory for the 1000 users with 3 domain controllers, 2 in one site, one in the other.  We did have a fibre-optic connection between all buildings locally and leased T1s or better between the other sites.  But the point is, you only need a couple of DCs unless your org is multi-thousand large.

By joining the workstations to the domain you gain many benefits - including remote desktop management, single user accounts on each system for logins, MUCH greater management capabilities, just to name a few.  Personally, unless your links between buildings are via ISDN or dialup, I don't understand why you'd want the workstation to NOT be members of the domain.  Assuming the servers are, then everything can access everything else with relative ease.
0
 

Author Comment

by:teachellen
ID: 12023175
I have about 200 users and they all will hit the same domain controller.  We have one building that has a direct t1, but only 10 mg switches that we are trying to replace.  I was just questions my decisions on the way things  are set up .  thanks for inf
0
 

Assisted Solution

by:jjtaylor
jjtaylor earned 25 total points
ID: 12027844
Just make sure you pass the username with the domain name before it from the command line using the users tag.

example:

net use z: \\computer\share /USER:domain\user

you will be prompted for the password and all should work well...
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:royjonesjr
ID: 12030256
I agree with leew - I would add Active directory to the server down the street and join them to the domain. Make sure you setup Sites and Services so that the PC's in that building will authenticate to that Active Directory Server. This also affords you a back to your main Active Directory. There potentially could be a lot of work setting that all back up for 200 users not to mention down time. In the event of a failure at least they would be able to authenticate somewhere.

My  $.02

0

Featured Post

Guide to Performance: Optimization & Monitoring

Nowadays, monitoring is a mixture of tools, systems, and codes—making it a very complex process. And with this complexity, comes variables for failure. Get DZone’s new Guide to Performance to learn how to proactively find these variables and solve them before a disruption occurs.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

Title # Comments Views Activity
Ping and real time 48 84
Personal Secured Home Networking 2 49
AD Design Best Practices 6 39
Exchange 2016 - not receiving mail 17 49
Don’t let your business fall victim to the coming apocalypse – use our Survival Guide for the Fax Apocalypse to identify the risks and signs of zombie fax activities at your business.
Most of the applications these days are on Cloud. Cloud is ubiquitous with many service providers in the market. Since it has many benefits such as cost reduction, software updates, remote access, disaster recovery and much more.
Get a first impression of how PRTG looks and learn how it works.   This video is a short introduction to PRTG, as an initial overview or as a quick start for new PRTG users.
In this tutorial you'll learn about bandwidth monitoring with flows and packet sniffing with our network monitoring solution PRTG Network Monitor (https://www.paessler.com/prtg). If you're interested in additional methods for monitoring bandwidt…

730 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question