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Trnsferring data

Posted on 2004-09-10
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Last Modified: 2010-04-26
I have  a dead pc (motherboard dead) and am planning to buy a new one.

The data should be fine on the old hard disk but it has win98 installed on it and the new PC I buy will have xp.

If the OS on the old hard drive was xp then I guess I could just put my old HD in the new pc as a slave and transfer data.  However, I assume this is not possible if the OSs on each hard drive are different.

So my question is how can I transfer the old data to the new hard drive?

Regards

Wing
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Question by:WingYip
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by:sirbounty
ID: 12025931
This should give you the steps you need to install the old harddrive in your new system:
http://www.pcmech.com/show/harddrive/43/

And XP will read the data from 98, no problems...
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by:WingYip
ID: 12026024
So I guess I would first set up the new pc, then put the old hd in as a slave and transfer data.  Will it honestly be as smooth as that (assuming that the old hd is not faulty)?  Anything that can go wrong here?

Wing
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sirbounty earned 100 total points
ID: 12026070
You just want to make sure that you either jumper your old drive as slave, or install it on your secondary controller.

Most new systems would have the hard drive on the primary controller and a CD rom or DVD on the secondary (you'll have two IDE controllers in your computer).
The 'new' drive will either be jumpered as Master or CS (Cable Select).  If it's CS, you can try setting the old one to CS and install it on the Primary controller (same cable the 'new' drive is on) and yes, it should be that simple.

Once you have physically installed it, you may need to go into your BIOS (generally F1, Del, Esc, F2, F10 before the operating system loads) and set it up to recognize the new drive (just set it to Auto select, it may be already though).

Once it's seen in BIOS, there should be no problems in XP. : )
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by:WingYip
ID: 12026229
Is this the case even if the file systems are different ie ntfs and fat?
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by:Lee W, MVP
Lee W, MVP earned 25 total points
ID: 12026340
XP can read NTFS and FAT12/FAT16/FAT32 (collectively, FAT).

98 Can ONLY read FAT and cannot read NTFS

In short, XP will have no problem reading that disk, provided that disk isn't corrupt or otherwise not working.
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by:WingYip
ID: 12026365
cool thanks a lot
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by:Lee W, MVP
ID: 12026399
Slightly longer:

95, 98, Me are considered 9x based Operating systems and with the exception of the very first release of 95, they can all read FAT12/FAT16/FAT32 (The very first version of 95 does not understand FAT32)

NT, 2000, XP are considered NT-based operating systems.  NT Based operating systems can read NTFS.

NT 4.0 - reads FAT12/FAT16/NTFS4 (Can read NTFS5 with Service Pack 4; can read FAT32 with appropriate 3rd party driver)
2000 - reads FAT (all versions), NTFS (all versions)
XP - same as 2K
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by:sirbounty
ID: 12026409
98 doesn't natively support NTFS, so it's really a non-issue.
If 98 did support it, (hypothetically speaking), or more accurately, you had a version of Windows NT with NTFS on it, then yes XP would read it...

Bottom line the file system is irrelevant here.
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by:WingYip
ID: 12026433
Much obliged to both of you

Best regards

Wing
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