Solved

Move Exchange 2000 server to another computer with the same name in the same domain

Posted on 2004-09-10
9
237 Views
Last Modified: 2012-05-05
I have a domain with Windows 2000 server with AD and also my file server and a second machine as an exchange server. The exchange server is old and too small and I got a new server. What are the steps for moving exchange from the old server to the new one. I know that I have to extract the data (mailboxes and public folders - I have used exmerge before if that is the way to go) and I can rename the old server so that I can give the new one the same name.  Is there anything that I have to do to AD to prepare for the move? I have found lots of articles describing move from Exchange 5.5 to 2000, but none for moving from 2000 to 2000. Any help with the proper steps and procedures would be appreciated.
0
Comment
Question by:dashman
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • +1
9 Comments
 
LVL 18

Expert Comment

by:exx1976
ID: 12028793
Why does it have to be the same name?  It would be much easier to just bring the new one up along side the old one, and then do mailbox move to get everything over there, create your public folder instances, wait for them to replicate, and then follow the MS instructions for removing the original server...


??
0
 

Author Comment

by:dashman
ID: 12029287
I thought it would be easier if the exchange server had the same name. Then I would not have to go to all the Outlook clients and have them look to a new server name to find the mail.

When you say "do mailbox move" and "create public folder instances", what are the procedures for doing them? Where would I find the MS instructions for removing the original server? Is there anything that I have to do in the AD?

Thanks
0
 
LVL 20

Accepted Solution

by:
Debsyl99 earned 500 total points
ID: 12029291
Hi
This is the relevant MS Article,
How to move Exchange 2000 to new hardware and keep the same server name
http://support.microsoft.com/?id=297289

Deb :))
0
Optimizing Cloud Backup for Low Bandwidth

With cloud storage prices going down a growing number of SMBs start to use it for backup storage. Unfortunately, business data volume rarely fits the average Internet speed. This article provides an overview of main Internet speed challenges and reveals backup best practices.

 
LVL 20

Expert Comment

by:Debsyl99
ID: 12029331
And here's the one to use the "move server" method - requires different name for exchange server. This one is pretty easy though ;)

http://www.swinc.com/resources/exchange/faq_db.asp?status=questions&faqID=1001&faqname=Exchange%202000§ionID=1024§ionName=Exchange%202000%20Move%20Server%20Method

Deb :))
0
 

Expert Comment

by:siexton
ID: 12030481
I'm assuming your using Outlook 2002, or higher.  When you migrate a user from one server to the next in an Exchange / Active Directory environment, the client will automatically detect that the clients mailbox has been moved to a different server and make the change for you.  I've done this twice now for two different companies, and each had over 1,000 users.  I agree, updating all of the clients would be a nightmare.  There are not very many documents about moving from Exchange 2000 to Exchange 2000.  You will need to change the Master server if you have any routing groups set up.  Also, the default address book location will need to get migrated.  Migrate the public folders first, because they will be the first thing to cause you problems if there are going to be any.  These links help me when doing this kind of migration:

http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb%3ben-us%3b152959

http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;328287&Product=exch2003

"Mailbox Move" simply means that you right click a user and select exchange tasks.  Then select Move Mailbox.  

0
 

Author Comment

by:dashman
ID: 12031848
siexton,

I have several users who are still on Outlook 2000. Does this mean that I will have to move them to the new server manually? I take it you are suggesting that I give the new server a different name and have them both joined to the domain at the same time and then remove the older one after I have migrated the info and users? This is my first time doing this and I really am not sure of the order of the steps involved so want to have a plan before I start. I am sure you can appreciate that.

Thanks for your assistance.

0
 

Expert Comment

by:siexton
ID: 12034065
If the Outlook 2000 clients are running in Corporate mode, then the answer should be yes.  I'm trying to confirm that, I was in a migration meeting with a Microsoft rep, and that's how I know about it.  So far I havent found it documented anywhere.  Bringing up a second exchange server will make your migration go much smoother.  It affords you time to move all of the public folders.  Migrate the users in phases, and finally transfer all of the address books, routing master roles, etc to the new server.  Plus you can test everything before making the switch, and if for some reason the new server gives you some grief, the old server is still available to fall back on.  Is your Exchange server also running as a domain controller?  Global catalog?
0
 

Expert Comment

by:siexton
ID: 12034107
This is a good article for moving public and system folders.  Ignore my first link.  It has good information, but I was out of the office and didnt have a chance to review it.  This one is much more detailed and pertains exclusively to Exchange 2000

http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?kbid=307917

This has step by step instructions for moving public/system folders.  Also, you may read about PFMigrate, that is for 2000 - 2003 migrations. Which is a different animal.  
0
 
LVL 18

Expert Comment

by:exx1976
ID: 12038795
Even 5.5 would re-direct clients.  It has nothing to do with which version of Outlook you run.  We ran 97 with E5.5, and when we switched to 2000, I just left the 5.5 server up for a while, updated the clients to 2000, then moved the mailboxes.  The clients contact the server they are configured to, and the server tells the clients where the mailbox has been relocated to.

HTH,
exx
0

Featured Post

Best Practices: Disaster Recovery Testing

Besides backup, any IT division should have a disaster recovery plan. You will find a few tips below relating to the development of such a plan and to what issues one should pay special attention in the course of backup planning.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

Title # Comments Views Activity
Active directory user account audit 4 731
Print Server: How to Create it? 1 763
Recreate New ADC 1 278
Domain Controller all of a sudden stop replicating 3 448
NTFS file system has been developed by Microsoft that is widely used by Windows NT operating system and its advanced versions. It is the mostly used over FAT file system as it provides superior features like reliability, security, storage, efficienc…
Data breaches are on the rise, and companies are preparing by boosting their cybersecurity budgets. According to the Cybersecurity Market Report (http://www.cybersecurityventures.com/cybersecurity-market-report), worldwide spending on cybersecurity …
Microsoft Active Directory, the widely used IT infrastructure, is known for its high risk of credential theft. The best way to test your Active Directory’s vulnerabilities to pass-the-ticket, pass-the-hash, privilege escalation, and malware attacks …
The Email Laundry PDF encryption service allows companies to send confidential encrypted  emails to anybody. The PDF document can also contain attachments that are embedded in the encrypted PDF. The password is randomly generated by The Email Laundr…

809 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question