Solved

Local SYSTEM account, analyzing security settings

Posted on 2004-09-11
6
197 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-04
I use a W2K server with a group policy, that makes some W2K Prof machines auto-install an msi file.

The W2K prof machine starts up and shows that it starts installing the msi file, but only for a second. The package was not installed.

In the event log you can see an error that says that the source for the package cannot be found. Microsoft describes this case in Q278472. Installing the package by hand works well (being Administrator). The package is located on a network share, on the DC. I have tested several ways when putting the package into group policy, like "\\servername\..." or "\\192.168.1.6\..." etc, but nothing works. I have checked the security credentials for the share, for the subfolder and all in-between folders. "SYSTEM" is there and has always full access. I also included the machine's local account (in security settings, I can browse for objects and selected the computer symbol of the W2K Prof PC), also with full access.

Now I want to test if the local SYSTEM account of the W2K Prof machine has really access to the target folder. But how ?

I know two years ago I managed to open a CMD window by using the task planner (and just saying "start cmd.exe in one minute"), but there must have been an additionyl trick.

Any idea anyone ?

Or, can I change a service on the local machine to run the installation under another account ?

There may be some reason for SYSTEM not being able to have access (english W2K server after initial german W2K server installation, several W2K Prof machines were built with a partition image and then NewSID was used, ...)
0
Comment
Question by:PC-Alex
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 3
  • 2
6 Comments
 
LVL 5

Expert Comment

by:burningmace
ID: 12033963
I'm not sure if this will help, but you can configure services to run under another username by doing the following:

1) Right click the taskbar and click properties
2) Go to the Start Menu tab and click "Customize..."
3) Go to the Advanced tab and scroll all the way to the bottom
4) Under "System Administrative Tools" choose "Display on the All Programs menu and the Start menu"
5) Click OK on both windows.
6) Click Start -> Administrative Tools -> Services
7) Find the service you want and double-click it.
8) Go the the LogOn tab and select "This Account"
9) Use "Browse..." to find the account and type the password into the two boxes.

Hope it's usefull
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:PC-Alex
ID: 12034187
Hallo burningmace,

*how* to assign another user I already knew, but *which* service is the one to enforce the group policy (and to install the msi package) is the question. And, of course: What happens to my system if a system service now runs under a different user :-)

Thank you anyway.
0
 
LVL 85

Accepted Solution

by:
oBdA earned 500 total points
ID: 12039276
You should get your "system simulation access" by opening a command prompt, then entering
at <CurrentTime + 2 minutes> /interactive cmd
After about two minutes (you can add 1 minute only, if you're typing fast enough ...), a new command window will pop up; this one will run under the system account.
0
Put Machine Learning to Work--Protect Your Clients

Machine learning means Smarter Cybersecurity™ Solutions.
As technology continues to advance, managing and analyzing massive data sets just can’t be accomplished by humans alone. It requires huge amounts of memory and storage, as well as the high-speed power of the cloud.

 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:PC-Alex
ID: 12039521
Thanks oBdA. I can test it tomorrow in the office.
0
 
LVL 5

Expert Comment

by:burningmace
ID: 12043889
Group policies can be tricky buggers, when things go wrong I just abandon the install-at-boot using msiconfig and "Run As..." (Right Click -> Run As...) the MSI.

I've found it useful in games, especially Max Payne, which seems to hate non-admin accounts.
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:PC-Alex
ID: 12057923
Thanks, oBdA, with this command I managed to open a DOS box and find out why it didn't work.

The workstations authenticate on the 2000Server as "ANONYMOUS LOGON". So I could extend the security settings and now the GP - Installations work.

burningmace, where can I apply for being hired ? I'd like my company installing games centrally ;-)
0

Featured Post

Enroll in June's Course of the Month

June’s Course of the Month is now available! Experts Exchange’s Premium Members, Team Accounts, and Qualified Experts have access to a complimentary course each month as part of their membership—an extra way to sharpen your skills and increase training.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Users of Windows 10 Professional can disable automatic reboots using the policy editor. This tool is not included in the Windows home edition. But don't worry! Follow the instructions below to install (a Win7) policy editor on your Windows 10 Home e…
Security measures require Windows be logged in using Standard User login (not Administrator).  Yet, sometimes an application has to be run “As Administrator” from a Standard User login.  This paper describes how to create a shortcut icon to launch a…
If you're a developer or IT admin, you’re probably tasked with managing multiple websites, servers, applications, and levels of security on a daily basis. While this can be extremely time consuming, it can also be frustrating when systems aren't wor…
Monitoring a network: how to monitor network services and why? Michael Kulchisky, MCSE, MCSA, MCP, VTSP, VSP, CCSP outlines the philosophy behind service monitoring and why a handshake validation is critical in network monitoring. Software utilized …

691 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question