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Copying Windows 2000 Server to a new server.

Posted on 2004-09-11
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How would I go about copying the contents of one server to another?  I just setup another server here at home.  I just want to move the contents of the old server to the new so I do not need to create new users and etc.  The two machines are both windows 2000 servers.  Can I copy over the old active directory to the new?  How can I accomplish this task?  I have already set up the new server, w/ windows 2000 and it is ready.

I realized, that when I set up this new server with the same identical name of the old server, and same ip address.  Of course the old server is shut down at the present time.  When I checked the event manager, and I saw two of machines trying to log in but it said something about trust relationship, and I needed to rebuild that trust.  So what I did was just attempted to re-join the new domain.  But now apparently the two computers have new desktops. ?? Why?  it looks like it built a new profile for "pent18" user.  Now I see the subdirectories as pent18 and also a new one as pent18.<servername> .. why??

Thanks.
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Question by:clubxny
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Lee W, MVP earned 150 total points
ID: 12036598
I'm going to assume that you had the OLD server set up as an Active Directory domain controller.  If that's true, then put the new server in a workgroup.  Once that's done, on the new server, CHANGE it's name (what's in a name anyway?).   So now you have SERVER-OLD and SERVER-NEW, the latter not in a domain.  Join the domain of the old server.  Once that's done, run DCPROMO on the new server.  This will install Active Directory on the new server and (assuming you read through the wizard and do things logically), it will setup the new server as a domain controller with a copy of all existing accounts you had on the old server.  Once done, go to the old server and run DCPROMO on it - follow the wizard to remove active directory from it.  This will leave you with the new server as your domain controller with all the accounts, and the old one will be a mere server with nothing special about it.

As for the two different profiles, Windows uses GUIDs (Globally unique Identifiers) and SIDs (Security Identifiers) to determine who that folder belongs to.  When you log in as a user, it checks the docs & Settings folder for a profile with that name - then it checks the GUID &/or SID to ensure it's the RIGHT user.  If not, then it appends the machine name, domain name, or even a number to the profile name.
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