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My Video Card and VCRs

Hello, I'm not sure if this is the right area to be asking this question, but:

I was wondering what things I'd need(Hardware/Software/Cables/Knowledge) to be able to Link my video card to my VCR and record onto my computer.

My Video card is a Radeon 7500 ( http://www.ati.com/products/radeon7500/radeon7500/ )

My Computers specs (if you need them):
ADM Athlon XP 2400+ (2GHz) processor
768MB Ram
40GB HDD (26GB free)
XP Home

I'm hoping to record 20-30 hrs but I'm not sure that I have enough space, though I suppose I could compress it.

        Thanks for any help,
                                        Boyidiot

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Boyidiot
Asked:
Boyidiot
4 Solutions
 
Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
You want your computer to BE the VCR?  Or you want your VCR to record what is displayed on your monitor?  I'll assume you're looking to make the computer the VCR.  If that's the case, you need a video capture card of some sort.  There are many, some much better than others.  You'll also need software to act as the VCR timer/channel changer.

I highly recommend you have a look at www.dvdrhelp.com.

For how-tos on capturing, see
http://www.videohelp.com/capture

Cheapest capture card is ~$40US.  One of the best is around $200-250US.  (Based on their user ratings).
http://www.videohelp.com/capturecards.php?&orderby=Rating



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WakeupCommented:
Agree, you will need a capture card.  Also the amount of drive space that you require, depends on what kind of quality and how large you want the video recording to be.  Generally DVD quality 2 hours runs around 4 gig and up.

If you are running VHS/VCD quality, two hours can run about a gig or less.

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mcp_jonCommented:
The better thing for you to do is, first of all increase the size of your RAM, the more the better, and buy a separate Hard Disk only to work with Video, buy a 7200 RPM with 8 Mb of Cache memory, if possible of course !

You'll see a lot of performance in this two solutions i gave you.

Best Regards !


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nickg5Commented:
I wanted to put my VHS tapes on VCD(cd media). I went to Ebay and bought a Lifeview Fly Video TV/video capture card. It works fine. It goes into a pci slot and has a connector just like on the back of your TV, so you can run a standard coaxial cable from your VCR to the video card. Not trying to replace the card you have but for $20 or less (that is what I paid), I solved my problem with no extra equipment, software, etc. The Fly Video opens a screen on your computer monitor. My VCR is out of my cable box so I can use my Fly Video to also watch TV on my computer or record the TV program. Same thing on recording VHS. It is a video capture device. The only problem is compressing it to make smaller files.  Not sure what you want to do with your VHS tapes, put them on VCD's or store them on your computer and view them that way. But the flyvideo is a inexpensive way to do it as well as experiment, which is what I needed since I was starting from scratch. Lifeview has a website and you can get drivers. I have Windows XP.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Quick note on format - if you can figure it out, I'd recommend recording things to XviD or DivX AVI files.  They can get MUCH better quality than the MPEGs do in considerably less space (Entire 600x400 resolution 2 hour movie can be made to fit on a single 700 MB disc.  Right now, not many players support DivX or XviD discs unless you're running them through a computer, but this way you have something of a master copy in REALLY good quality.  Of course, you are transferrring from VHS so it's not going to be GREAT quality....
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tpilgCommented:
I personally like the v-stream xpert dvd maker. This is a spidery looking thing that on one side connects into a usb port in your PC and on the other into the vhs via either the svideo or composite plug it has. It requires no tinkering under the bonnet. It is also much cheaper than slot in cards with, I find, slightly better quality. This device comes with software to capture the VHS. If you save it as mpeg2, you can get fairly good compression. In any case when you have captured a VHS tape, you can then convert it to divx - the internet is full of these converters. The only other issue is the scart plug/cabling. Most vhs players have scart and also commonplace are svideo to scart cables such as for PS2's. However you have to be a bit careful. The PS2 scart socket is one way i.e. it is designed to take from s-svideo to scart and doesn't work the other way round. Make sure you get bidirectional.
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nickg5Commented:
tpilg:
are you saying that the v-stream xpert dvd maker, can convert VHS to DVD and that file can be burned on to a DVD- blank media?
Can NERO do the burning?
thanks
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XSINUXCommented:
You will need a S-Video Cable to perfom this interface

1) Ensure that the Drivers are installed. The Display Settings would then
show the Display with the Card info in the Pull-Down Tab with Plug and
Play Monitor Info.Else it would just display (Default Monitor) on and no
Card Name.
Use this Link to see the Tabs :
http://www.realtimesoft.com/multimon/reviews/3mon_rad9k/


2) Once the Video Card Drivers are installed Click on the advanced settings and
proceed to the ATI Display Settings. Click on Advanced Settings and go to the displays settings and turn on the TV.

You can do it, just follow this link.
http://www.realtimesoft.com/multimon/reviews/3mon_rad9k/

Note : The TV Option in the Displays maybe available only when you have used the S-Video Cable connected between the Latop and the TV and if the TV is turned on.

Good Luck

Sinu
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