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What is Netware 5.1 's equivalent to the Windows everyone ??? I need to let all read a folder.

What is Netware 5.1 's equivalent to the Windows everyone ??? I need to let all read a folder.
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dorgunr
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dorgunr
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2 Solutions
 
ShineOnCommented:
Everyone.
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ShineOnCommented:
You could also grant file access rights to the user container (OU) and they will be inherited by all leaf objects in the container.
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ShineOnCommented:
The difference is that everyone isn't automatically in the "everyone" group like Windoze.  You decide who is in the "everyone" group.   Usually, it's something you add to the user templates, but you are in control of who is in "everyone."
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dorgunrAuthor Commented:
I have no everyone there !

I gave public r fs rights and all is well
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PsiCopCommented:
I think the last NetWare environment in which an EVERYONE Group existed *by default* was NetWare v3.x. A lot of environments using later versions of NetWare had it because they'd been upgraded. As I recall, dorgunr is starting his NetWare environment with an NDS version of NetWare.

dorgunr, NDS differs in a number of ways from Windoze - a major difference is that there are no *fixed* default user accounts of Groups. In Windoze, there's always an "Administrator" account, and it can't be deleted, nor can the name be changed. Not so in the NDS environment - there is a default user account, admin, but it can be renamed, or even deleted. Same thing with an "EVERYONE" Group. It doesn't have to exist, and a Group fulfilling that purpose can be named anything. If you want users added to it when you create them, simply use a Template to generate the user objects and add the Template to the Group.
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ShineOnCommented:
Public will do it - if you truly want *everyone* to be able to read it.  You should give filescan, also, if you want everyone to be able to see it.
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PsiCopCommented:
Yeah, using the Public object is tackling the problem using NDS.

Personally, I prefer not to use the Public object, especially for filesystem rights, because those rights are available to UNauthenticated connections. Using the OU in which the user objects exist (as suggested by ShineOn) is a much better way to grant filesystem rights by leveraging the Directory Service. That way the rights are only available to authenticated users.
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ShineOnCommented:
Yead, I gotta remember to be less cryptic.  That's what I meant by "if you truly want *everyone* to be able to read it."  That granting FS rights to Public opens it to any connection, authenticated or not.
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PsiCopCommented:
Well, its hard to remember to cover every nuance of a situation. That's what the rest of us and points splits are for. :-)
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