Non root user open ports below 1024

Is it possible to allow a non root user permissions to open ports below 1024. I am trying to run an application that needs to listen on port 162 for SNMP traps but if the app is started as a non root user the app doesnt start. If I start is a root it runs okay. Any ideas?
pmg2004Asked:
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TintinCommented:
Is the application something you have control of?

It's common to have process that listens to a privileged port is started as root and then forks off a process as a non priviledged user.
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pmg2004Author Commented:
The port is actually being opened by a WebLogic startup class, and we are trying to avoid running WebLogic as root. Is it possible to grant permission to the user that starts WebLogic to open port 162?
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jlevieCommented:
> Is it possible to grant permission to the user that starts WebLogic to open port 162?

No. To open a port less than 1024 root privs are required. Of course that doesn't mean that the user must be root since you could make the task suid to root on execution.
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chris_calabreseCommented:
Umm, just because it is possible to create an SNMP agent under WebSphere doesn't mean that it is a good idea....
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ahoffmannCommented:
simple question, simple answer: NO.
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Matt_AveryCommented:
The canonical example of a process that listens on privileged ports as "root" and hands off the connections to other low-privilege processes is of course "inetd". If you can engineer your thingy to run under "inetd", you will avoid re-inventing the wheel.
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Computer101Commented:
PAQed - no points refunded (of 125)

Computer101
E-E Admin
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