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Overclocking DDR Ram PC2400 to PC2700 ?

Posted on 2004-09-15
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Last Modified: 2013-11-10
I've got some an unusual DDR ram stick in my system. A Corsair Micron 256MB/DDR300 PC2400 (MT 46v16m8-75a) [ note: many times i see it labeled as Micron 256MB DDR266 PC2100 ]. The other stick is a OCZ PC2700 DDR333.

My system used a Tbird 1GHZ @ 266MHZ FSB but now that i'm upgrading to the Athlon XP 2800+ Barton and a Gigabyte GA-7VT600-PL mobo I would like to kick up the FSB. I believe the mobo and CPU can do 400MHZ but the memory OCZ mem stick can do 333MHZ and the Corsair is 300MHZ, and so i cant exceed 300MHZ FSB. Is this correct?

My question is can i simply manually set the FSB to 333MHZ in order to force the entire system to use that FSB or will this immediately or eventually destroy the slower Corsair memory stick? Geez, just an extra 33MHZ and we'd have something.  Perhaps i can overclock the memory stick, but how the heck is this done?

I would like to save myself $50 from purchasing a new PC2700 when the single PC2400 stick is so close to matching up with the other, though i do not want an unstable PC which can die after a few months.  Not worth it.

Thanks.
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Question by:ljaques
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8 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:fixnix
ID: 12063467
It would make sense that if your PC2400 stick was stable at 333 then it would have been sold as a PC2700 in the first place to generate another dollar or two to the reseller.  You can bump up the FSB and see what happens if you're adventerous, but I'd put my money on sporiatic data corruption.  I'm not much of an overclocking fan in the first place, but kudos to those that are...more power to ya.  If you decide to try it, and your ram doesn't have a heat spreader on it, then get one and you *might* be okay.  (Heat spreader is usually a stick-length copper sheet that clips on top of the chips on both sides.)  Again, with my not-so-fond attitude towards overclocking, I personally wouldn't bother as probems might not be noticable immediately (files getting corrupt when being saved to disk, even though they looked fine on screen during the save, apps swapped from disk to ram and back making the trip successfully 95% of the time, b00gering data the other 5%, etc), but I'm sure there are many broke college kids who overclock everything and will say another 33MHz would work fine.  I used to overclock...I even overclocked a Kyocera combo phone/Palm Pilot 33% years ago...but you don't see overclocking of corporate servers, fileservers, database clusters, webservers, research clusters, etc where data integrity is important.  With every company and organization out there trying to cut costs and operate more efficiently, it would seem overclocked hardware would be commonplace in the profesisonal IT world if it were worthwhile.  Just my $0.02.
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Expert Comment

by:Callandor
ID: 12063963
Corsair parts are usually high quality, so overclocking a little may work.  It won't damage your system if you try boosting the FSB - it'll probably just not boot, if it can't do it.  Overvoltage is more likely to cause damage than overclocking the bus.
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Author Comment

by:ljaques
ID: 12064017
Would there be much of a visibile difference going 333MHZ FSB from 266?
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Expert Comment

by:Callandor
ID: 12064238
Yes, because you are going to include the FSB multiplier to get your final speed, so if it's 13.5x, which is a Barton 2800+ multiplier, that 66 translates to 891MHz.
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Author Comment

by:ljaques
ID: 12066674
Hahaha, I really do need to go and read up on this stuff.  :P

Curious, with my current DDR sticks and having to set the FSB to 266MHZ does this dramatically slow down the Athlon XP CPU and overall system performance on the new mobo to that of my old TBird 1GHZ/old mobo which ram at 266MHZ FSB?

Sorry for the zany questions.  Still feeling out this whole realm.
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Author Comment

by:ljaques
ID: 12066934
Reading a few things on line.  I think im beginning to see what you're saying.  Ouch.
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Callandor earned 100 total points
ID: 12067664
Actually, I was off on that multiplier - the Barton 2800+ has a 12.5 multiplier, so a 66MHz bus difference yields an 825MHz cpu speed difference.  If you run the Barton at 133 instead of 166 (also known as 266 vs 333, in double-data rate terms), your cpu will be at 1662MHz, which is still faster than 1000.
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Author Comment

by:ljaques
ID: 12069049
...yes but no where near the 2.075MHZ its supposed to be running at.   :P

Interesting stuff.  I never realized how important it was to get DDR Ram which at least equals the FSB speeds.  I've even heard problems of getting ram which is faster than the FSB.  HAhahaa, crazy stuff.

Thanks.
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