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connection to linux redhat 8.0

Posted on 2004-09-15
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Last Modified: 2013-11-30
Hi all

My XP Pro SP1 PC is on a LAN (Domain) I can get remote connection access to another XP Pro SP1 machine which is also on the LAN. The machine I get remote connection to has a linux PC connected to it, however the linux machine (redhat 8.0) is not connected to the LAN. The linux machine obtains internet access via the XP Pro machine using it as a gateway.

What I want to do is access the linux machine from the first XP machine in my office remotly.

I want to know how I can take over the linux machine over the internet because I cant get the remote client on the linux machine to work, also when doing netmeeting from the XP machine and putting the linux IP address in an error comes up saying the linux machine is not configured for netmeeting.

H
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Question by:Huseyin1
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ActionJaxsen earned 250 total points
ID: 12070460
This is going to be tough to accomplish the way you have your network configured. I'm curious as to why you don't just hook up the Linux machine to the network? I'm assuming that you have the second Windows XP machine configured with the built-in Internet Connection Sharing. If this is the case, you will not be able to access the Linux machine from the first Windows XP machine. The reason for this is: Internet Connection Sharing is really only designed as a gateway to allow computers out on to the internet, it doesn't help traffic get back in. What you're looking to do would require an actual physical router, or router software installed on the XP machine that would provide NAT (Network Address Translation).

The way a real router would accomplish this would be to set up what are called "forwarding rules." Basically you can setup these rules to say "Whenever traffic on this port is coming in, redirect it to this server." For example: on my network I have a router that attaches directly to my DSL service. All of my computers then connect to that router. Whenever any computer wants to get to the internet, the router forwards their traffic out. Whenever any computer wants to connect to any other computer, the router just sends the traffic, and whenever I want to use Remote Desktop to connect to one of the computers, it forwards that Remote Desktop traffic to the specified computer.

So bottom line: routing is a pretty complex procedure and contains many abilities that Windows XP's Internet Connection Sharing just does not. Luckily, routers can be obtained for relatively cheap these days (sometimes as low as $10). So my reccomendation would be one of the following:

1) Connect the Linux machine directly to the LAN
2) Buy a physical router and place it between the second XP machine and the Linux machine
3) It is possible, though I wouldn't reccomend it, to make Windows act as a real router without using the Internet Connection Sharing feature. Here's a link to some basic info to set it up. I'm not sure where you would set up all of the forwarding rules though. http://www.wown.com/j_helmig/w2kprout.htm
4) Buy or download some routing software to install on the second Windows XP machine. I'm not personally familiar with any software solutions for Windows (there are several for Linux) but I've heard that they exist.
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