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DSN - Not resloving all computers on the network

Posted on 2004-09-16
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We just got 2 Dell servers with Redhat Enterprise Edition 3 on them, and they will be used as database servers when we switch to a new Oracle Database.  We have started doing some preliminary setup (Internet, Samba (for moving files to it), etc).  We set the DNS to point to our DNS server and it seemed to be working right until we tried to add a network printer.  

For some reason the linux box can "see" the other computers on the same subnet as itself, but can not find the computers on our other subnets.  I am a linux newbie and really need some assistance, but for the sake of my untrained mind, please try to explain things to me in simple terms.

by the way all of our other servers, and machines are Windows based.  We also have a WINS server for some of our older boxes to use.
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Question by:Intern
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by:jlevie
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Does the DNS have A records for those printers?

Are they in the same subdomain?

Is the default route set correctly?

What happens if you do 'host printername'?
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by:GRV_Consulting
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The network printer ... is it just a printer that you have shared from one of the PCs or does it have its own print server? One of the most common causes of strange problems that I see is that on most print servers there is a built in DHCP server which is turned on by default.
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Anonymouslemming earned 500 total points
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Couple of questions. You say the the Linux servers can 'see' machines in the same subnet. Do you mean you can resolve hostnames for these machines, or you can actually reach them with ping, traceroute, etc.

Can you resolve the host names of the printers? To test this, do the following from the prompt:
/usr/bin/host <printername>
where <printername> is the FQDN of your printer (host.domain)

If that doesn't work, you should check that you can resolve other hosts in your domain that the Linux machines can 'see'.

The next thing to check is your default route. You will need a route for traffic to get from one subnet to another. To check this, run the following at a prompt :
/bin/netstat -rn | grep "^0.0.0.0"

You should get something like the following back:
0.0.0.0     10.xxx.xxx.xxx    0.0.0.0    UG   0 0     0 ethx

Where I have put 10.xxx.xxx.xxx, you should see the value for your default gateway.

HTH
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