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Recommended partition size of Windows 2003 Server Standard Edition

Posted on 2004-09-17
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Last Modified: 2010-04-19
Dear all experts,

 I just bought a Windows 2003 Server which is used for file sharining.  This server has 3 * 72GB HD which is running as Raid 5.  Thefore, it has around 140 GB for data storage.  My question is, how large should be the system parition?  Moreover MSDE is also installed and which is used by Backup Exec for logging.

Regards
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Question by:towo2002
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by:karel_jespers
ID: 12082577
for the system partition i take at least 3 gb
put you logs on other partitions
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by:Lee W, MVP
ID: 12083570
If you set things up properly (logs on other partitions, data files (Exchange) on other partitions, then I'd probably make the C: drive 5-10 GB.  You don't want to underestimate because future upgrades can become PAINFUL.  But you don't want to over estimate either because the space could be used for file sharing, etc.  Basically, only you can answer this correctly.  What else do you plan on or think you might have the remotest need of installing on the system?  Allow space for those items now (plus at least 1GB extra for upgrades).

By the way, Windows won't install if you don't have 1.5x RAM in free disk space - so if you plan on ever upgrading, RAM, make sure you have 1.5GBxRAM + sufficient space for Windows and whatever apps/server programs you may use (You can always get around the 1.5xRAM thing by removing RAM to do the install and putting it back, but Windows will typically create a page file during the install and use 1.5xRAM.  You can move the page file as soon as Windows is setup, but until then, you're stuck with it on C:
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EricdJ earned 125 total points
ID: 12084203
I would agree with the other colleagues. and will mention in addition:

- you need at least up to 2 GB for the setup files (depending on your server version).
- keep in mind the pagefile size (about twice your RAM)
- keep enough free space for additional tasks, like defragmenting. (40%)
- keep enough free space for future fixes/packs (25%)
- put your logs to a separate volume.
... so my suggestion would be 5 (OS) + 3 (page file) + 2 (fixes) + 3 (other programs) makes 13 GB and round off upwards to 15-20 GB for additional tasks.

- In addition i would mention the 'shadow copy' feature of windows 2003, which is very interesting in your scenario of a file server. As it provides users (and you as a operator) the option of recovering a deleted file(s) from the file server (share) without having to restore a backup!! A very useful and introducing article on this can be found on http://www.petri.co.il/what's_shadow_copy_on_windows_server_2003.htm.

good luck.

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by:mikeleebrla
ID: 12084553
keep in mind that you can move the page file to any local drive... to it doesn't have to be on the system/boot partition at all.
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by:karel_jespers
ID: 12086348
you better never do that ,
place it on another physical drive   !!!
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by:karel_jespers
ID: 12086351
if possible of course
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by:mikeleebrla
ID: 12087378
its on the boot partition by default
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