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how do i browse  hdd in Linux?

Posted on 2004-09-18
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Last Modified: 2013-12-06
I have couple of hard drives running  windows XP. How do i browse those hard drives in Linux red hat 9?
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Question by:Carl3003
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by:avizit
ID: 12092719
I dont remember correctly but I think you will have a directory where the windows partition are automatically mounted

check if there is a directory  "/mnt/windows" or something like that

also note if your windows partition is NTFS , the write support might be flaky , so its better just to read from the
windows partition and not to attempt any writes .. unless someone who knows tells you otherwise or the write support for NTFS is stable and good ..
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by:Carl3003
ID: 12092854
in mnt directory i have only cdrom and floppy..
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Mysidia earned 50 total points
ID: 12092877
Mount the drives onto the Linux virtual filesystem as needed...

I'm not sure that Redhat 9 has the needed drivers to correctly read the new NTFS
filesystem, but you can try from a terminal.  (all as root)

mkdir /mnt/temp1

Now to mount one of your windows drives you need to know how its laid out (which device the filesystem
is on) and whether you're using the NTFS or FAT filesystem.. which option you chose to format with when
you installed windows; usually this is NTFS on a new installation of windows.

The drive names are represented by device nodes (depending on where you put the hard drive)
Assuming they are regular IDE drives they represent:

/dev/hda1   == First partition on the primary master drive
/dev/hda2   == Second partition on the primary master drive
/dev/hda3   == Third partition  on the primary master drive
/dev/hda4   == Fourth  on the primary master drive
/dev/hda5   == First extended partition... etc

/dev/hdb1  == First partition on the primary slave
/dev/hdc1  == First partition on the secondary master
/dev/hdd1  == First partition on the secondary slave

Now suppose it's the NTFS filesystem, and the Windows filesystem is on the first
partition of the primary master, you might do:

mount -t ntfs -o ro /dev/hda1 /mnt/temp1

If it were Win95/98 FAT...

mount -t vfat -o ro /dev/hda1 /mnt/temp1

Now once it's mounted the files can be browsed by looking in /mnt/temp1
i.e. ls /mnt/temp1/

When finished, to unmount the filesystem:

umount /mnt/temp1
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by:Carl3003
ID: 12092932
  [root@localhost temp1]# mount -t ntfs -o ro /dev/hda1 /mnt/temp1
mount: fs type ntfs not supported by kernel



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by:avizit
ID: 12092959
That means you dont have NTFS support

http://www.brandonhutchinson.com/redhat_ntfs_support.html  might help

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by:owensleftfoot
ID: 12093014
You can read & write to ntfs partitions under linux by using captive -
http://www.jankratochvil.net/project/captive/
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Author Comment

by:Carl3003
ID: 12093308
captive seems to me easier to handle;however, i run to this problem..
[root@localhost dosc]# mount -t captive-ntfs /dev/hda1 /mnt/dosc
mount: fs type captive-ntfs not supported by kernel
[root@localhost dosc]# mount -t captive-ntfs /dev/hda2 /mnt/dosc
mount: fs type captive-ntfs not supported by kernel
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Expert Comment

by:owensleftfoot
ID: 12093477
Hvae you tried running captive-install-acquire?
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Author Comment

by:Carl3003
ID: 12093556
all i did was  double click on captive-static-1.1.5-0.i386.rpm . I thought this method works to install..
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Expert Comment

by:Mysidia
ID: 12093784
Maybe it did, if not, then perhaps try using
rpm --install captive-static-1.1.5-0.i386.rpm
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Expert Comment

by:Mysidia
ID: 12093793
Wait, adding the rpm provides the programs you need
you still need to run captive-install-acquire to get the drivers...

See
http://www.jankratochvil.net/project/captive/man/captive-install-acquire.pod.html

The need to run acquire is mentioned specifically in the installation notes:
http://www.jankratochvil.net/project/captive/#notes
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by:dfk
ID: 12101928
Carl

NTFS is a database type file system and is not officially supported under linux.  There are several bolt on applications that would allow you to read from the filesystem but having the read/write capability should be avoided for now.

If you can, split your hdd and create a FAT32 partition.  This is fully supported under linux and you can use the FAT32 partition to transfer files between your XP instance and your linux instance.


If you do want to risk writing to NTFS via linux, I would recommend recompiling your kernel as it sounds as though you have not got kernel support (modular or built-in) for the NTFS parition.

Hope that helps
Best Regards
Mark Waterhouse
{company advert removed - ai, cs admin}
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