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Downloading Web pages

I am having some problems downloading web pages on my LAN. I have a Linksys router/adsl modem set up and all the lights are green indicating I have LAN connection and a connection to my ISP. Is my default gateway relevant here? I'm not sure how the gateway is used or why it is required.

Peter
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Peter_Fabri
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Peter_Fabri
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adamdrayerCommented:
Yes your gateway is very important here.  Your computer should be configured with the IP address of the router as it's gateway.  This should be handled automatically through DHCP however.  Is your computer set to "obtain IP address automatically"?  as well as DNS settings?

goto a command prompt, and type "ipconfig /all".  It should tell you your IP address, and gateway, DNS settings.

can you ping the router?  can you ping www.google.com?
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Peter_FabriAuthor Commented:
The IP address of my router is 192.168.1.1 The default gateway IP address of my Workstation is 192.168.1.11. The default gateway IP address of my server is 192.168.1.3. I do not have my DHCP configured to obtain IP addresses automatically, but the router is using DHCP. My DNS server is working fine as I can use nslookup for name/ip addresses.

I can ping the router.

Do I have to configure my LAN so that the router address is the defaukt gateway?

Peter
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adamdrayerCommented:
yes...  your gateway is the device that will forward packets outside of your network.  all devices that you want to have internet access(or access to any network outside its own) need to know the IP address of the device that will make the next hop in communication.  This is your router.  All computers should be configured with the router as the Gateway.  There are of course exceptions, however it usually invloves multiple subnets, multiple routers, proxy servers, etc...

>>The default gateway IP address of my Workstation is 192.168.1.11. The default gateway IP address of my server is 192.168.1.3<<

These are the default gateways or IP addresses?  If your router is using DHCP, why not set your computer to obtain IP address automatically.  It will most likely solve all your problems as your router will configure the computers on startup with the proper informtion.
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adamdrayerCommented:
if you are using an internal server for DNS or any other service, you will need to keep a static address on that particular computer though.  Is DHCP active on this server?  if it is, then you have a decision to make as you should not have to DHCP devices on one network.
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Peter_FabriAuthor Commented:
I have DHCP active on my server but don't use it as I don't want the IP address of my server to change.

Peter
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adamdrayerCommented:
well saying that you have DHCP active or that your server is "running DHCP" usually means that your server handing out IP addresses to other workstations.  In order for DHCP to work, there needs to be a "DHCP server", and workstations need to be configured as "DHCP clients"

You should not have 2 "DHCP servers" on one network.  Your router most likely is running DHCP, so your Server shouldn't.  If your server is indeed a server os (Win2k Server / Win2k3 Server / NT Server) then you should configure it with a static IP address, subnet mask and gateway.  I'll take a stab and say it should look like this:

IP address: 192.168.1.3
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
Gateway: 192.168.1.1

Are you running a domain?  or active-directory?  if not then the DNS servers should be configured with the IP addresses specified by your ISP.

As for the other computers, they should be configured as "obtain IP address automatically" unless you have a specific reason that they shouldn't.

How many computers are we talking aobut and what versions of Windows?
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Peter_FabriAuthor Commented:
I am running Active Directory. I have given my hosts static IP addresses but for no specific reason. My Dell Poweredge server at the moment has a Dell Workstation running Windows 2000 Professional and one Toshiba laptop running Windows XP Professional.

My setup is a test setup at home so that I can experiment an d learn more about networking.


Peter
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adamdrayerCommented:
ok.  that helps quite a bit.  first off, AD(Active Directory) require the domain controller(server) to run DNS.  your workstation also need to point to that server for DNS.  your sever should point to itself for DNS, and you should configure forwarders your ISP's DNS servers.

Your Domain Controller should also be the one who issues the IP addresses to your workstation, and therefore should be running DHCP as a service, but should not have "obtain IP address automatically" selected.

If you assign the workstations static IP addresses, you need to configure DNS with static HOST and PTR(optional but recommended) records.  If you decide to let the workstations use DHCP by setting "obtain IP address automatically" then you need to configure the DNS service to allow dynamic DNS registration.  You will also need to reserve your server's address in your DHCP scope so that it does not lease it to another workstation resulting in an IP conflict.  Since your server will be running DHCP you will need to disable DHCP on your router as not to run into "route DHCP server" problems.  All gateways should be the router however.  You can configure this all on each machine, or you can configure this once in the DHCP server, and let it flow through to your workstations by configuring them for "obtain IP address automatically"

truth is that is a very complicated thing for a beginner, and your intenet service will not work properly at all times until you get both DNS, and the addressing scheme to work.  You should really pick up books or try and find website that give you windows networking tutorials so that you can understand everything involved in a domain.

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Peter_FabriAuthor Commented:
My DHCP scopes are in the range 10.0.0.3 to 10.0.0.254. I don't think I can change these to 192.168.x.x range. Do I have to change to the 10.0.0.3 range for things to work on my LAN? It's all getting a bit confusing!

Peter
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adamdrayerCommented:
People go to school for this stuff.

all your computers including your router need to be in the same range.  Your DHCP server definately has to be in the same range as the addresses it's serving.  You  should be able to change your scope or delete it and create a new one.  
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