• C

Tokenizing a string (since strtok() appears to be deprecated)

Okay, first off, this question *is* related to a homework assignment, however it's not the main thrust of it -- the assignment is to write a rudimentary analogue of gdb for a toy VM for an operating systems course.   That being said, if anyone doesn't want to answer on the basis of the preceding, feel free.

Anyway, as part of the debugger, I'm needing to parse commands entered by the user.  What I need is to take a string and get two things out of it.. essentially argc and argv[].  So, since every manpage on the subject says "Don't use strtok!!!" what are the alternatives, and how should I go about getting all of this info?  The text is going to be a series of integer values separated by spaces.  Anything else should allow me to spit out an error.

I just want to reiterate that this is *not* the assignment, this is a small part of it, and the rest is the hard part -- which I'm doing myself.  Please don't chew me out over this :)
offline314159Asked:
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Jaime OlivaresSoftware ArchitectCommented:
If you have to parse a string that contains many integers separated by spaces, then sscanf() appears to be enough.
Even if you have different arguments for different command, then you can analize command first and the do sscanf() according to command syntax.
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offline314159Author Commented:
Sounds promising...

However, there's the potential of arbitrary numbers of arguments.  Is there a graceful way of handling this?  I suppose there's always an array of int* that I can fill as I go, keeping count...

I would prefer an easier method, though :)
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offline314159Author Commented:
Oh well. I'm just limiting the number of arguments to something manageable, and I'll hope that it's good enough.  What are the odds that they're going to throw more than 10 addresses at a set breakpoint instruction anyway ?  (famous last words, I know...)
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