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Moving to SBS 2003 from in use NT4.0 Server

Posted on 2004-09-19
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Currently there is a NT4.0 Server running exchange with 10-20 useraccounts . Purchased a SBS2003 from Dell. I need for someone to outline the process for moving from one to the other. The current server is in use daily and cannot have any interruptions. As I cannot create a trust, I am at a loss on how best to transfer users/shares/data/exchange etc. into the new envoirment. I just dont know where to start. This project was left for me by the previous IT person. Was I left a mess or a blessing ?  
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Question by:neo881
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scampgb earned 500 total points
ID: 12096063
Hi neo881,

Put it this way, I don't envy the position you're in.
What you need to do is possible, but it's going to be a little challenge for you.  There's a lot of manual work involved in doing this.
You will have some disruption while you do the transfer of everything, so I suggest that you do it over a weekend when the users aren't using the system.

If lack of disruption is that important, then you'll need to buy a full copy of Windows Server & Exchange Server :)

As there's so much to cover, this answer will have to be a bit of an overview:

BEFORE THE TRANSFER

Set up a NEW domain on your SBS server.  You can't have it the same as your old domain name, it will cause problems.
Create all of the users & groups manually
Set up all the required file shares manually
Install the DNS, DHCP and WINS services.  Make sure that you don't activate the DHCP scope if it'll conflict with your existing server.
Install Exchange.
Create the user mailboxes, set up their addresses "for real".  Configure your SMTP smarthost.

Using a test machine make sure that you can log into the new domain with a user account and send external mail.  You won't be receiving mail on this box as yet.
If you need ISA server, set that up too :-)
Set up any printers

TEST THE ABOVE TO DESTRUCTION!  You don't want to do the transfer until you're happy that all that is done.



TRANSFER DAY
On the SBS server, run a command like : NET USE * \\oldserver\sharename /user:OLDDOMAIN\ADMINISTRATOR
It will ask you for the Admin password on the old domain and create a drive letter on your SBS server that points to the named share
Copy the data from one server to another.
Check all the relevant file permissions and ownership.

For the Exchange mailboxes, get yourself a copy of EXMERGE (http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=429163ec-dcdf-47dc-96da-1c12d67327d5&displaylang=en)

Use this on your OLD server to export the contents of the users' mailboxes to a .pst file
Transfer to .pst file to your NEW server and use EXMERGE to import it into the new mailbox.

Move all of the client PCs to the new domain.  Reconfigure their Outlook profiles to point to the new server.  They'll have to set up any mailbox settings (signatures etc) again.

I'm sure I've missed something in the above, but there's a lot to cover :)

I suggest that you "dry run" the TRANSFER DAY stuff - particularly the file copying and EXMERGE stuff.  There's no harm in doing that.

Does that help?
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by:scampgb
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The MS article http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;327304&Product=exchange explains how to do the EXMERGE bit.  It's about Exchange 2000, but should be the same for 2003.

Also - I've just remembered something :-)

When you've done the above, you'll have to reconfigure inbound mail delivery.  How you do that depends on how mail is being delivered to you.
If you have a firewall performing NAT, reconfigure it to point to your new server's IP and the job's done.
If you have some other setup for inbound mail, you'll need to update it accordingly.  Let me know if you need more info - you'll need to thoroughly describe how inbound mail gets to you first though :-)
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by:scampgb
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neo881,
Thanks for the "A".  Glad I could help.

Good luck :)


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