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size of an integer

Posted on 2004-09-19
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Last Modified: 2010-05-18
Hi,

I wonder if there is a function that I can know the size of an integer value??  Just like "sizeof" function in C++???
Any idea??

Help~~~~



Xenia
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Question by:xenia27
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brettmjohnson earned 200 total points
ID: 12098843
The size of integers varies in dialects of C to correspond to the native word size of
the underlying hardware.  Java is a "Virtual Machine", whose word size is always
32-bits, no matter what the underlying hardware.  Since, by definition, the size of
and int in Java will always be 32 bits, there is no need for sizeof().
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Author Comment

by:xenia27
ID: 12098868
so in Java, I don't have any function like "sizeof" because the sizes of any kinda variables are fixed???
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Author Comment

by:xenia27
ID: 12098899
so how can I know how many bits I actually used??
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Assisted Solution

by:objects
objects earned 100 total points
ID: 12099067
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by:xenia27
ID: 12099128
OK...let me confirm what I understand from all the post and the article...so the size of all variables is fixed...and that means all bits will be used when you declare a variable and store something into the variable...even though we don't need to use all bits???
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by:objects
ID: 12099147
that is correct, so if you wanted to converve space then you would pick a data type that is just big enough.
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Expert Comment

by:thomas908
ID: 12099206
>>so the size of all variables is fixed.

Except for boolean, which is platform dependent
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Assisted Solution

by:sciuriware
sciuriware earned 100 total points
ID: 12099467
xenia27, all of today's computers are byte oriented although they transfer their data in words (32, 48, 60, 64 or 128 bits)

In the good old days all mainframes were word oriented: if a CDC was 60 bits, you had to hussle in assembler
to pack your 6-bits texts or your 8-bits ASCII into words (because memory was few then).

Nowadays memory is plenty; sharing an integer between 2 variables that only need a part
of it (say 3 bits resp. 5 bits) is a bit strange with all those Mb or Gb around.
But if you must, you can write a class in which fields are shared between getters and setters.

(the result will be slower and BIGGER than straight code).

You can do it, if you must ........................

..... did you consider if you ever in your life use the last track on your hard disk?
;JOOP!
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