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DNS server 101 - my first DNS Server

Posted on 2004-09-20
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Last Modified: 2010-04-10

I want to understand DNS so I am going to build one (along with sendmail/exchange/apache/IIS servers).

The network connection is a cable modem with a Nat router / UPS combo.   I seem to keep my IP until the Nat Router looses power for a while which is almost never.  

I register a name at Godaddy.com and pointed my DNS servers back to my "static" IP.  

The DNS server is a Suse Linux Professional that has a gui to manage it ( looks nice but will it work :)

Questions:

1 ) What port should I forward ( virtual server) through my Nat router.  I checked http://www.iana.org/popular.htm  and now I am more confused than ever.  

2)  What can I put in my DNS server?   The whole authoritative  issue confuses me.  If I make a domain  xyz.org and my computers points to it, can I resolve for myself microsoft.com, netscape.net and Bubba_bbq_chitlins.com ?  I am not talking about cashing or forwarding, can I resolve for my local machines, the IP addresses I assign to these machines.  An example of this would be registering for my computers MR_Bill.com to resolve to Microsoft.com ?

3)  Iis there a good how-to site for DNS so I can learn this stuff quickly without purchasing a good book?   I am 'tween jobs again.      
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Question by:TIMFOX123
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by:Marakush
Marakush earned 200 total points
ID: 12106349
Hmmm first you have to register your DNS server. You will find the link on godaddy's site.

Okay as to your second question.

let's say you buy foo.com, now with a DNS you can do things like mail.foo.com or citrix.foo.com or www.foo.com and the like. It tells the root level servers that your DNS is authoritive for your domain name, and knows everything about your domain.

Third Question:

What exactly are you going to use your DNS server for?

Marakush
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PsiCop earned 200 total points
ID: 12106352
1) Generally, port 53/tcp and 53/udp can both be used for DNS queries. Newer versions of BIND can use higher ports, but can be configured to limit themselves to port 53.

2) Your DNS server is going to resolve those Domains for which it has information, and will place queries on your client's behalf for those Domains for which it does not have information. The DNS server's configuration files tell it for what Domains it has information. If it receives a query concerning another Domain, and it is permitted to allow recursive queries from the client make the query, then it will use whatever resolution information is at its disposal to attempt to resolve that query. It will also cache the results locally so that subsequent queries are answered from its cache rather than resulting in re-resolution.

3) Which site is best to use depends on what DNS server you're using. You haven't specified that or its version.
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by:TIMFOX123
ID: 12108586
I really do want to thank you both for the input.  Currenty I am trying this out.   Thank you both again.  
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by:freakyuno
freakyuno earned 100 total points
ID: 12108656
Also, as to one thing you mentioned.  You can set your local dns server to resolve whatever you want to whatever you want.  You need to be carefull with that though, cause you can cause caching on your machines that could screw things up later.

For example:

You can set up an alias in your DNS server that points to a host record.

host record is microsoft.com resolved to microsoft's ip.

You can then set up an alias that points to that host record as Mr-Bill.

You open a browser window and type http://Mr-Bill into it, and boom, it shoots you to the microsoft website.

DNS Servers can get complicated, but for the most part they are easy.  If you only have one DNS server on a network, just imagine it as your mother.  What it says goes...(it has authority).  Your computers connected to it (as long as they are told to look to it by DHCP or static addressing) try to resolve ALL names at it first, if it cant resolve it, it uses what are call forwarders, or root hints to get what your looking for.  Which is a complicated way to say, it asks someone else, then tells your computer the answer like it knew all along.
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Author Comment

by:TIMFOX123
ID: 12109333
The MR-Bill thing was just to see if I was understanding what is going on.   I am setting up a DNS server and have just one IP to resolve ( mine).    I can try some static entries to see if it speeds up the resolution and also I have some data for my DNS records.   I was reading about IPv6 and it has some great things, one of which is my ISP would let me have several IP addresses for free.  They want 60$ a month to add 6 ip's to my conection.   This is without increasing my bandwidth.

You all have been very helpfull.  

Oh, I found a great site so I do not have to buy a book:  linuxforum.com
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