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File Recovery

Posted on 2004-09-21
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Last Modified: 2010-04-13
I need help in the worse way.  Due to hurricane damage at my office we had to bring our computers home to do our work.  I have an Access file on the C: drive of this computer that I need to copy to my home computer.  The office machine is Windows 2000 Professional and my password no longer works.  I have been able to find a utility that allows me to see the files on the hard drive in DOS mode.  However, I cannot copy them to any media since the file is 5MB and the office computer only has a CD drive and a 3 1/2" floppy drive.  The utilty I found was able to copy files less than 1.44MB to a floppy from the C: drive, but it does not allow for multiple disks for one file.  Any ideas?  There are 500 points for anyone who points me to a utility that will enable me to grab this file from the hard drive onto 4 floppies.
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Question by:critter017
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by:Luc Franken
ID: 12114189
Hi critter017,

A pretty old, but very useful for your problem will be the DOS version of RAR which you can download from:
http://downloads.zdnet.co.uk/0,39025604,39071245s,00.htm

With it, you can create a RAR archive on one or more floppies and recover the file that way.

Greetings,

LucF
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by:Dufo G. Belski
ID: 12114192
Winzip will span floppies.  www.winzip.com
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by:critter017
ID: 12114734
Not sure either solution is viable.  How could I zip the file if I cannot access the hard drive?  As of right now I can use a utility to see and copy the files on the NTFS hard drive.  I cannot start DOS on the office computer since I do not have a DOS boot disk that was created from the Windows 2000 installation CD.  The office computer probably has Winzip on it, but how would I run it without a command line?  The utility I found would have been great if only the file I needed was less than 1.44MB.  It just would not copy past that limit or ask for another disk.
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by:markoid
ID: 12115095
The best option would be to obtain a new HDD and replace you current drive with the new one. Install a fresh copy of W2K onto it and the you can slave your second disk and get access to this drive to get you data.
Or you could slave the disk onto another PC if you have one about the office or home.
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by:Luc Franken
ID: 12115778
critter017,
The RAR version I pointed to can be ran from a dos prompt, and can be used to compress and store the file to floppies, it's also small enough to be ran from a floppy. I don't see the problem here :)

What markoid pointed out might be even an easier way, just slave the disk to another system and get the file of the troubling one.

LucF
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by:critter017
ID: 12116333
LucF  The problem with your solution is that I cannot get to the C: drive from the DOS prompt.  The only drive I get is the A drive where my floppy is.  Part of my dilemma is not being able to boot up in DOS where I can see the files on the hard disk.  Evidently in order to see files on a NTFS formatted disk from a DOS command line you need something more.  On the internet my research reveals that in order to boot up in DOS on a Windows 2000 machine you would have needed to create a boot disk from the Windows 2000 installation CD which I did not and I only have Windows 98 at home.
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Luc Franken earned 500 total points
ID: 12116360
You can use the win2k bootdisks which you can download from http://www.bootdisk.com
Direct download link: http://www.svrops.com/svrops/downloads/zipfiles/win2kpro.zip
That way you can boot into recovery console and recover your file.

LucF
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by:4ceReconSniper
ID: 12119487
i recommend 4thsplit, i used it and it can even split files even the size of a 3.5 floppy with SELF UNITING option
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by:Longbow
ID: 12121580
- Here are some tools you can use in order to access your C: partition NTFS Dos). You can download a readonly version for free at the end of the page.

http://www.sysinternals.com/ntw2k/freeware/ntfsdos.shtml

 - If you have a second computer you can put your harddisk thers.
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by:critter017
ID: 12206644
Although the answer from LucF did notwork for me, it led me to another option.  I found a Linux solution that enabled me to see the Windows 2000 passwords on my office computer.  I was then able to boot into Windoews 2000 and copy the files I needed.  I am awarding the points to LucF since his answers led me to the final solution.
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by:Luc Franken
ID: 12206895
Glad to help :)

LucF
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