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Redhat - user security...

I used a  cut -d : -f 1,5 /etc/passwd command to get a list of "users" on my system...

The odd thing is there are alot I don't recognize. But maybe I'm just not familiar.

My question is, when you setup a system (install linux) is there a default password for say, mail, or pcap, or news...  or can those not be used to access the server from SSH2 (port 22 access) ?? I just want to make sure when I install a system, someone can't connect to port 22 via SSH and type mail (a default password) and enter the system...

is operator:operator a normal user/group?
or games:games?

If so, what would changing the passwords for all of those do if anything??

Thank you very much for any help anyone can lend...  

Best regards,

Dr34m3r

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dr34m3rs
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dr34m3rs
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sunnycoderCommented:
Hi dr34m3rs,

> is there a default password for say, mail, or pcap, or news...  
An account, yes ... Password, I am unsure

>or can those not be used to access the server from SSH2 (port 22 access) ??
No ... These accounts do not permit interactive login

Sunnycoder
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pjedmondCommented:
Nope - there is no default password for these accounts.

If you look at your /etc/password file you'll see something like:

pcap:x:77:77::/var/arpwatch:/sbin/nologin

The x as the second term means that the passwd is shadowed...so you look at /etc/shadow and you get:

pcap:!!:12604:0:99999:7:::

The !! means that there is no valid password. If there was, then the second term would be a long MD5 hash string starting with $1$

Generally, most default settings will be configured to be 'safe' in the current climate of internet security. This is not necessarily the case with older software. You are right to ask, as if you don't there is always the risk that something could go horibly wrong at a later date. With security, you MUST be 100% correct adn confortable with the confguration.

HTH:)
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pjedmondCommented:
Another point....the last tem in the /etc/passwd line relates to the login shell. /sbin/nologin prevents shell logins even if there is a valid password!
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dr34m3rsAuthor Commented:
Awesome thanks! :)
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