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How to maintain VLAN tags over a routed connection.

Posted on 2004-09-22
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Last Modified: 2008-03-03
I have a VOIP system from Shoretel which allows me to specify which vlan telephones and PRI interface boxes will reside in (in our case vlan 105).

I want to add a remote site which will be connected to our main site by a dedicated T1.  The T1 will carry both VOIP and general data traffic, so what I need to do is find a router that will let me do two things:

1.  Let me specify that all VOIP traffic in vlan 105 has priority over all other traffic that is going over the T1, and

2. when a VLAN 105 packet goes over the T1 link I need the vlan tag left intact  when the packet is put onto the ethernet network at the remote end of the T1 - its seems that most routers strip of the vlan tags when the pass the packet over the routed link (I was looking to use Adtran's Netvanta 1224R)

Any ideas or commects would be welcome.  Am I just not thinking about this problem correctly?


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Question by:martynhills
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PennGwyn earned 125 total points
ID: 12126212
> Am I just not thinking about this problem correctly?

Yes.  Tagging is an implementation detail of one form of *traffic encapsulation*.  There are others which typically apply over WAN connections, such as VPN tunnels or VCs (virtual connections).

You need two things for the traffic over the T1:  QoS/priority, and traffic to/from VLAN 105 (which can be identified by its source/target address) to map to some VLAN at the remote location, which even if it's also number 105 is NOT the same subnet/VLAN.


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by:csco10011009
csco10011009 earned 125 total points
ID: 12129373
You can use L2TPV3 in certain Cisco products to do this. You can also investigate MPLS tagging.

I would simply us a router that can support VLAN trunking on the Ethernet interface. This should allow you to put the router into both networks at each site, and route between them.

You mention QoS requirements as well. Most routers perform QoS at L3, which of course rules out your bridging scenerio above.

Cisco (hey, I'm a cisco guy) supports significant QoS capabilities.
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