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Isql for windows

Posted on 2004-09-22
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Hi

I am totally new to this area. I have a Sybase dabase on Linux. I want to connect to that database from a windows machine. What all i need for this and how can i connect to Sybase through command line from my windows based PC.

Thanks in advance
Firoze
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Question by:firozepasha
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leonstryker earned 500 total points
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You should have a Sybase client installed on your PC.  This would give you the tools to access the database with ISQL or by other means (like ODBC)

Leon
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by:leonstryker
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From http://www.faqs.org/faqs/databases/sybase-faq/part15/

The Basics of Connecting to Sybase

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The following describes how to connect to Sybase ASE on a UNIX machine from a
windows client with isql etc.  The specific example is Sybase ASE 11.9 on
Redhat Linux 6.1, using Windows 95 and NT.  (Have both on partitions and the
process was the same... This is not a technical review or an in-depth
discussion (there are people far more qualified than me for that ;-) ).  Rather
it is more along the lines of "This is how I managed it, it should work for
you". As always there are no guarantees, so it if goes wrong, it's your fault
[<g>].

The starting point for this discussion has to be, you've downloaded (or
whatever means you used to acquire it) both Sybase ASE for Linux and the PC
Client software (a big zip file) and are ready to install. I'm not going to
discuss the install process as Sybase managed to do a good job of that, so
I'm leaving well alone. The bit you have to take notice of is when you run
srvbuild. This should happen the first time you log on as the user sybase after
the install.  If it doesn't then you can run it by hand after, it line in the
$SYBASE directory under bin. The reason why I'm mentioning this is that
srvbuild defaults to installing your database using the name "localhost". Now
the problem with localhost is that it is kind of a special case and would mean
that you could not connect to your database from anywhere other that the server
itself. This would defeat the object of this
discussion, so simply name it something else, bob, george, albert, mydatabase,
whatever, the choice is yours.

Having done this (it takes a while to complete) you should now have a running
database. so try to connect to it on the local machine with something like isql
-SServerName -Usa, (where ServerName is whatever you called it when you ran
srvbuild) when it asks for a password, just press enter and you should be
greeted by the monumentous welcome

1>

Not a lot for all the work you have done to get to this point, but you've
connected to your database and that's the main thing. This is very important as
not only does this mean that your database is working, but it also means that
the server half of Open Client is working. This is because even isql on the
server connects to the database using Open Client and you've just proved it
works, cool. Next run dsedit on the server and make a note of the following 3
things:

    1: The server name
    2: The IP address
    3: The port
   
Your going to need these to get connected from windows.

Now switch to you windows machine, did I remember to tell you to shut down
dsedit on the server?, consider it said ;-). Unpack the PC Client software zip
file and install it using the instructions that came with it. They worked fine
for me and I'm an idiot, so they should work for you. When you've finished, go
to the start menu and start dsedit (on my machine it's under programs ->
sybase). When it runs, it begins with a dialog asking you which Interface
driver to open, I've done this 3 times and went with the default every time, so
it should be a safe bet. At this point you can now add your Linux based server.
Select the menu item serverobject->add. Then enter the name of the server you
just got from your Linux box, in the field labeled "server". It is probably a
good idea that it is the same name you got from your Linux based dsedit to
ensure that everyone is referring to the same server with the same name.
Prevents confusion.  This then opens a new window with several fields, one of
which is the server name you just entered. The bottom field is the bit where
you enter the "nitty gritty", the server IP address and port. To do this right
click on the field and select "modify attribute" to open the server address
dialog. When this new dialog opens click add to open yet another dialog (is
there an award for the most gratuitous use of the word dialog???). OK, this is
the last one, honest. Leave the drop down list where it is (hopefully showing
TCP/IP or something similar). Instead move straight to the address field and
enter the following: the Linux servers IP address followed by the port number
(the one from the server dsedit), separated by a comma. On my machine it looks
like this.

192.0.0.2,2501

Now you can "OK" your way back out of the dialogs, back up to where you started
from and exit dsedit. Then launch isql on the windows box and log in.
Personally I did this from a DOS prompt, using exactly the same syntax I did on
the Linux box, but that's just because I like it that way.  Now you should be
happily querying you Linux (or other UNIX for that matter) based Sybase ASE
database. What you do with it now, is covered elsewhere in this FAQ from people
able to tell you, unlike me. Now just one more time for good measure, I'm going
to type the word, wait for it.... Dialog
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by:ChrisKing
ID: 12124864
after installing Open Client (or as part of the server installation), you will find ISQL in the location of $SYBASE/$SYBASE_OCS/bin/isql
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by:ChrisKing
ID: 12543281
I object, Venabili has no Sybase experience and is not qualified to be a CV in this TA
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by:ChrisKing
ID: 12548806
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by:leonstryker
ID: 12616192
No comment has been added to this question in more than 21 days, so it is now classified as abandoned..
I will leave the following recommendation for this question in the Cleanup topic area:

Answered leonstryker

Any objections should be posted here in the next 4 days. After that time, the question will be closed.

leonstryker
EE Cleanup Volunteer
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