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Class.forName(visitNoteClass).newInstance();

hi!
I need to know what this line does in detail?
Class.forName(visitNoteClass).newInstance();

++++++++++++++++++++++      

      private String visitNoteClass = null;
      private HttpServletRequest request = null;
      private ActionMapping mapping = null;
...
...
            
      }
      public ActionForward execute() {
   
            VisitNoteType v = null;
            Connection conn = null;
            OraConnDispenser ocd = null;
            
            try {
                   v = (VisitNoteType) Class.forName(visitNoteClass).newInstance();            
                   v.init(request);
                   ocd = new OraConnDispenser(null);
                   conn = ocd.getConnection();
...
...
++++++++
thanks,
0
dkim18
Asked:
dkim18
4 Solutions
 
CEHJCommented:
It creates a new instance of VisitNoteType. 'visitNoteClass' will hold the fully-qulaified classname
0
 
SergeiKoCommented:
Hello, dkim18.

Look at this short example.


import  java.util.*;

class Test {
    public static void main( String[] args ) {
        // 1
        List list = new ArrayList();
        System.out.println( "list=" + list );

        // 2
        List reflectList = null;
        try {
            reflectList = (ArrayList)Class.forName( "java.util.ArrayList" ).newInstance();
        } catch ( ClassNotFoundException cnfe ) {
            cnfe.printStackTrace();
        } catch ( InstantiationException ie ) {
            ie.printStackTrace();
        } catch ( IllegalAccessException ie ) {
            ie.printStackTrace();
        }
        System.out.println( "reflectList=" + reflectList );
    }
}

Here we do the same thing in two ways.
1. First one is used when we know the class (implementation) before compilation. So we  
    can not to change implementation without recompiling.
2. Second one is used when we know the behaviour and want to change implementation
    without recompiling the program.
    E.g. we can get class name from system properties or command argument and
    instatiate implementation we want:
            reflectList = (ArrayList)Class.forName( arg[0] ).newInstance();

Regards.
0
 
objectsCommented:
> Class.forName(visitNoteClass).newInstance();

two things, firstly the call to forName() will return a Class instance for the named class (loading the class if necessary), secondly the newInstance() call will create a new instance of that class calling it's default constructor (no arguments).
0
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helloexpertCommented:
IMHO
it is not a good idea to create the class instance and instantiate in the same line.. At run time, u wouldnt be able to differentiate if an exception happends in Class.forName or in the newInstance()..

Always,
 do like this
 Class myclass = Class.forName( myclassname);
Object myObj = myclass.newInstance();

this way, in your application, things will be easier to debug, and would improve the readability of hte code.
0
 
CEHJCommented:
>>u wouldnt be able to differentiate if an exception happends in Class.forName or in the newInstance()..

Not strictly true, as different subclasses of Excepetion are thrown, although it does make the code more readable/maintainable
0
 
CEHJCommented:
:-)
0

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