Want to protect your cyber security and still get fast solutions? Ask a secure question today.Go Premium

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 307
  • Last Modified:

Adding a webmail link to a corporate site

using Server 2003 and Exchange.  Please advise on the security issues that would arise from installing a link (however small) on a 'business' website (not heavily traveled by any means) to allow employees Outlook Web Access?  Do larger business still practice this?  Is their a 'better' way; maybe having http://webmail.business.com point to the Exchange Outlook Web Access page?   what is safe and secure?
0
72chevy4x4
Asked:
72chevy4x4
  • 2
  • 2
1 Solution
 
SembeeCommented:
I wouldn't advertise the link anywhere - I would expect employees to remember it. However I don't see any reason why you cannot use OWA.
The only thing I would say is to an SSL certificate from somewhere like freessl.com and force the users to use HTTPS.

Simon.
0
 
72chevy4x4Author Commented:
What about letting SBS2003 create its own certificate?  I've tried the website in question and it automatically requires https (will not accept the http request).  
0
 
SembeeCommented:
The only problem with using the built in certificate is that it isn't trusted. It will generate errors each time it is used, unless the certificate is installed. It probably isn't a good idea to install the certificates everywhere as this will leave information about your configuration everywhere. Furthermore that certificate has probably been issued in the name of server.domain.com and you might want it to be webmail.domain.com

With FreeSSL doing certificates for some ridiculous sum like US$20/year I just think it looks more professional to have a real certificate that doesn't generate errors and allows the users to verify that it is legimate.

Simon.
0
 
72chevy4x4Author Commented:
regarding the certificates: that is one error I've run across, when the remote office logs on using https:server.business.com, an error stating the certificate holder's name is server.business.local pops up.  guess the original cert was incorrectly named.  The public has no knowledge of or use for the cert (no e-business or the likes going on), so I may not pursue the FreeSSL option, but thank you for the information.
0

Featured Post

Problems using Powershell and Active Directory?

Managing Active Directory does not always have to be complicated.  If you are spending more time trying instead of doing, then it's time to look at something else. For nearly 20 years, AD admins around the world have used one tool for day-to-day AD management: Hyena. Discover why

  • 2
  • 2
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now