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CHMOD file attributes

Posted on 2004-09-23
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Last Modified: 2010-05-18
I have a file that I would like to do the following to.  
Allow the owner to read
Allow the owner to write
Allow the owners group to read.  

Would it be chmod 640 file.txt  

Owner to read  400
Owner to write  200
Owners group to read  040
Rest of world do do nothing  

Add these together and one obtains 640.  
The question is first of all is this the correct syntax and if I want to give no permissions to everyone else
is this 0?  

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Question by:plate55
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griessh earned 125 total points
ID: 12135039
Hi plate55,

chmod 460 does what you want. There are different ways to use the chmod command. In case of any problems do a 'man chmod' and you will see all the options.

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Werner
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by:griessh
ID: 12135045
Sorry
460 sould be 640
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