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Disabling the Nagle Algorithm in Red Hat

Posted on 2004-09-23
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Does anyone know how to do this?  What about disabling the delayed ack algorithm as well.
Thanks to anyone that can help!
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Question by:dissolved
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by:jlevie
ID: 12139836
Disabling the Nagle Algorithm would be something to be done at the application code level by including TCP_NODELAY when opening the socket.

As far as I know, disabling delayed acks would require changes to the kernel's network stack.

Disabling the Nagle Algorithm makes sense for character oriented interactive connections (ssh, telnet, etc), but in the general case it would lead to poor network performance for most other applications that aren't doing buffered I/O. Likewise disabling delayed ack's would not help well behaved applications and decrease network performance.

Why would you want to do this?
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by:dissolved
ID: 12140026
Thanks jlevie.
So you're saying disabling nagle , would be harmful to applications that dont use the TCP sliding protocol?
How does an application decide if its going to use the sliding protocol or not by the way? Is it written that way?  


Disabling ACKs would increase the amount of frames on the network I assume?


I wanted to do this so I could watch on a sniffer, and note the changes.
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jlevie earned 500 total points
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The Nagle Algorithm is a mechanism for reducing the number of packets that must be sent to accomplish a data transfer. Whether it is used or not is a function of how data is being sent from the application layer. If the application layer is writing small amounts of data to the kernel and hasn't set TCP_NODELAY when it opened the socket the kernel is allowed to collect up writes to the socket into a a buffer and send that rather than sending a packet on each write. This may or may not involve the use of the sliding window protocol, depending on the rate at which data is being written to the connection and how much data is involved.

Yes, disabling delayed ACKs could result in an increase in the network traffic since every TCP packet would require an ACK.

Without an exhaustive analysis of the sniffer data or special tools I'd think it would be very difficult to tell exactly what's happening in this respect. And it seems to me that you'd have to pick one protocol to examine at a time. The behavior of say ssh is going to be radically different from FTP. And for something like HTTP content will dramatically influence what you see in a sniffer since it can vary from very small to quite large data transfers.
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by:dissolved
ID: 12140155
excellent explanation!  I was about to go to sleep when I picked up TCP/IP illustrated and reviewed chapter 19 again. Then it suddenly all made sense . And this answer just helps even more.
Thanks!
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by:dissolved
ID: 12140207
One more quick thing.  It's true that the delayed acknowledgement algorithm is never used in conjunction with the sliding window protocol correct.  The reason being: Is that data is always ready to be sent before the delayed ack timer goes off.

Or am I way off on this one?
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by:jlevie
ID: 12144004
No, that's not true. The sliding window protocol simply means that the receiver has advertised a window size larger than the MTU, which allows the sender to continue to push data out. There's nothing about that which implies that the sender may have more data ready to send or that the transmitted packets must be MTU sized.
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by:dissolved
ID: 12144163
So the receiver advertises a window size larger than the MTU, say 6000 bytes. That means, the sender will send up to 6000 bytes without requiring an ACK from the receiver correct?  I'm assuming the receiver ACKs, when all 6000 bytes have been taken off the receive buffer and processed.  Do I have that right?

I read that the objective to sliding window is to send the most data possible. And  to never allow for there to be enough of a pause in traffic so that the delayed ACK timer fires. If it does, it means that the sending station is waiting for a response.
Can you elaborate on that?  Say the receiver advertised a window size of 6000 bytes, but the sender only had 3000 bytes to send.  Is this a possible situation? Furthermore, wouldnt the receiver be expecting 3000 more bytes?
Thanks!
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by:jlevie
ID: 12145581
> That means, the sender will send up to 6000 bytes without requiring an ACK from the receiver correct?

In the general case no. Typically that transfer of 6kb will be done with a number of packets, each of which has a sequence number. The receiver has to tell the sender what sequence numbers it has received intact.

> Say the receiver advertised a window size of 6000 bytes, but the sender only had 3000 bytes to send.  Is
> this a possible situation?

Yes.

> Furthermore, wouldnt the receiver be expecting 3000 more bytes?

No, the window size just represents, at that point in time, how much buffer space the receiver has available.
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