Solved

Linux X screenshot using xwd

Posted on 2004-09-24
9
2,043 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-27
I'm trying to get the console (X display) screenshot from remote machine.
usera is login on the console and use display 0.0.
I want to get his screenshot.
I'm login using ssh as root, trying to:

prompt> xwd -root -out screenshot.xwd -display 0:0
Xlib: connection to "0:0.0" refused by server
Xlib: No protocol specified
xwd:  unable to open display '0:0'

The same for:
prompt> xwd -root -out screenshot.xwd -display 127.0.0.1:0

Adding all  to the xhost list fail:
prompt> xhost +
xhost:  unable to open display ""
The system os in redhat 8 Linux.

Regards,
Addady
0
Comment
Question by:addady
9 Comments
 
LVL 18

Accepted Solution

by:
liddler earned 25 total points
ID: 12141103
DISPLAY=:0.0 export DISPLAY
I'm not sure you've got you : and . correct
0
 
LVL 11

Expert Comment

by:griessh
ID: 12141783
liddler is right.

First step: set the DISPLAY variable on your target system: DISPLAY=:0.0 (:0 is the device, .0 is the screen)
Second step: xhost +

To enable a remote name by default, the name can be defined in the /etc/X?.hosts file, where ? is the display number to which you enable access.
0
 
LVL 20

Assisted Solution

by:Gns
Gns earned 25 total points
ID: 12194768
This is (as you correctly deduce) a problem related to the remote X seerver denying you access. There is no way for you to amend this other that to intruct usera to allow localhost access (blithely letting remotes "in" isn't recommeded.... at least not by me:-). Havi him/her do
xhost + localhost
in an xterm, then do the "localhost xwd" above.

-- Glenn
0
Technology Partners: We Want Your Opinion!

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

 
LVL 20

Expert Comment

by:Gns
ID: 12548736
As far as I can see I'm correct here... Although liddler is right that the first instance of the xwd command (in the Q) has a flawed display specification, the second (127.0.0.1:0) is equivalent to setting it to :0 ... And since that doesn't work, one can surmise that root lacks the proper credentials. Ergo, Adaddy needs do what I say (for the running instance... and perhaps add an explicit xhost + localhost in a suitable X startup script),

-- Glenn
0
 
LVL 18

Expert Comment

by:liddler
ID: 12960302
Venabili,
I think this one has been missed in a cleanup
0
 
LVL 20

Expert Comment

by:Venabili
ID: 14362612
liddler ,

Yeah... And after that I reduced my work as a CV for a while...
Handled now :)
0

Featured Post

Independent Software Vendors: We Want Your Opinion

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Hello fellow BSD lovers, I've created a patch process for patching openjdk6 for BSD (FreeBSD specifically), although I tried to keep all BSD versions in mind when creating my patch. Welcome to OpenJDK6 on BSD First let me start with a little …
Every server (virtual or physical) needs a console: and the console can be provided through hardware directly connected, software for remote connections, local connections, through a KVM, etc. This document explains the different types of consol…
Learn several ways to interact with files and get file information from the bash shell. ls lists the contents of a directory: Using the -a flag displays hidden files: Using the -l flag formats the output in a long list: The file command gives us mor…
Learn how to find files with the shell using the find and locate commands. Use locate to find a needle in a haystack.: With locate, check if the file still exists.: Use find to get the actual location of the file.:

685 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question