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how many hits would it take to exceed 1 gb of bandwidth?

Posted on 2004-09-24
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Last Modified: 2013-12-24
Hello.

I suck at math and could use a bit of help . . .

Most hosting companies charge an extra fee for extra bandwidth.

If the files (html, images, css etc) have an average size of 7 kb each, how many hits would it take for me to exceed 1 gb of bandwidth?

What about for an average of  3 kb, and what about for an average of 12 kb?

Remeber, there are 1,073,741,824 Bytes in one Gigabyte (not 1,000,000,000).  

This is enough to give me a headache . . .

Thanks!
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Question by:hankknight
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Expert Comment

by:Luc Franken
ID: 12144241
Hi hankknight,

This looks like a homework question to me. So please see the guidelines on homework first: http://www.experts-exchange.com/help.jsp#hi105

Your question is pretty easy, you allready know a GB isn't 1,000,000,000 bytes, but a bit more.
From bytes to kbytes is deviding by 1024.
So a GB will be 1,073,741,824/1024 = 1,048,576 kbyte.

Now your calculation will probably be a lot easier :)

Greetings,

LucF
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by:hankknight
ID: 12145094
Does 131,072 hits for an 8 kb file sound about right to you then?

For the record, this isn't a school or class related question, although it would make a good one  :-)

I am expecting 10,000 hits to my web site per month.  I would like to know if the 5 gb bandwith my hosting provider allows will be enough.  

If I did the math right, it should be more than enough.  Please let me know if I am missing something obvious (like a couple of zeros)

Thanks.
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Luc Franken earned 375 total points
ID: 12145142
>> Does 131,072 hits for an 8 kb file sound about right to you then?<<
Exactly :)
You'll have a little overhead, so to be on the safe side, consider 100,000 hits to be a good point.
With 10,000 hits each month, you'll have to see for yourself in the logs what pages are checked the most, so you can do a fair calculation it 5GB is sufficient, but even when you average each page at 500kb you'd still not cross this limit, so you'll probably be safe.

LucF
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by:hankknight
ID: 12145906
Thanks.  If I get more than 100,000 hits each month, I'll be glad to pay the extra bandwidth fee.
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by:Luc Franken
ID: 12146125
Glad to help :)

LucF
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