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crontab not working as expected on SuSE linux

Posted on 2004-09-24
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Last Modified: 2008-01-09
I have always set a cronjob as follows(say on RedHat):

crontab -e

and then type in the command in there like:

0,30 * * * *       root    /path/to/cron_script >/dev/null

I am doing exactly the same in SuSE linux....but it simply won't work!!

I then tried to write the same command in a file under /etc/cron.d/ (yast2-online-update is also under this directory). It still doesn't work!!!

What am I doing wrong???!!
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Question by:sandeep_th
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by:blkline
ID: 12144835
You should be using:

0,30 * * * *  /path/to/cron_script > /dev/null

The extra "root" in there is probably screwing things up.  If this crontab entry is for "root" then it will be run as "root".

Barry
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by:blkline
ID: 12144917
Looking at my comment I should have been clearer.

If you want to run this as "root", then put it root's crontab.  You can get the specifics of the crontab format by typing:

man 5 crontab

Barry
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by:sandeep_th
ID: 12145011
Doesn't work....it says in the SuSE Linux admin manual that(quoted verbatim):

/etc/crontab cannot be processed with crontab -e . It must be loaded directly into an editor, modified, then saved.

On opening /etc/crontab I found the following lines:

SHELL=/bin/sh
PATH=/usr/bin:/usr/sbin:/sbin:/bin:/usr/lib/news/bin
MAILTO=root
#
# check scripts in cron.hourly, cron.daily, cron.weekly, and cron.monthly
#
-*/15 * * * *   root  test -x /usr/lib/cron/run-crons && /usr/lib/cron/run-crons >/dev/null 2>&1
59 *  * * *     root  rm -f /var/spool/cron/lastrun/cron.hourly
14 4  * * *     root  rm -f /var/spool/cron/lastrun/cron.daily
29 4  * * 6     root  rm -f /var/spool/cron/lastrun/cron.weekly
44 4  1 * *     root  rm -f /var/spool/cron/lastrun/cron.monthly

So I added one of my own at the end:

* * * * *       root  rm -f /path/to/doodle

which should simply remove the file /path/to/doodle ...every minute.

It simply doesn't do it!!
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blkline earned 125 total points
ID: 12145192
Ahhh... there is the system crontab (which is in /etc), and there is a per-user crontab.  I hadn't thought about the one in /etc because I never modify that.  Sorry about that...

Did you restart the cron daemon after you changed the file?

/etc/init.d/cron restart

Barry
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by:blkline
ID: 12145276
I know that you aren't supposed to have to restart cron when you make a change to this but I was more interested so as to ensure that you have cron started!

Assuming that cron is running,  /pat/to/doodle is not marked immutable, is it?   Just for fun you can do something like this:

* * * * * root echo date >> /tmp/testdrive

and you should see a line added once per minute to the file.

Barry
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Author Comment

by:sandeep_th
ID: 12154290
That was it....i had to restart the cron daemon with :
/etc/init.d/cron restart

and it worked!!

editing crontab -e wouldn't require u to restart it...I wonder why they changed it!!

Also....just for interest....how do u mean "marked immutable"?
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by:blkline
ID: 12155479
The file can't be changed by anyone.  It's a safeguard against accidental (or malicious) change.

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