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addActionListener ....

Posted on 2004-09-25
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Last Modified: 2011-09-20
Hi Experts,

    I have a question about the following code :

  at line 00, does "this" refer to a PlayGame object or the mineButton[i] ?
  so .... must an "addActionListener" work with an actionPerfomed() method ? thanks !
-------------------------

public PlayGame(){
      System.out.print(ROW_NUM + "  " + COL_NUM) ;
      JPanel minePanel = new JPanel() ;
      minePanel.setLayout(new GridLayout(ROW_NUM,COL_NUM)) ;
      for(int i=0 ; i < ROW_NUM*COL_NUM; i++){ mineButton[i] = new Mine(i) ;
                                  mineButton[i].addActionListener(this);   // line 00
                                  minePanel.add(mineButton[i]) ;
      }
0
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Question by:meow00
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6 Comments
 
LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:OBCT
ID: 12153733
'this' refers to the PlayGame object.
So when calling addActionListener(this), your basically saying that the current ActionListener is implemented in the PlayGame object.
Therefore you'll need to make sure you do implement ActionListener for everything to work ok.
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LVL 37

Expert Comment

by:zzynx
ID: 12158061
this always refers to the current instance of the class it is in, in this case the PlayGame class.
So you add an ActionListener to the mineButton[i].
And that ActionListener is an instance of PlayGame.
To be able to do that, your PlayGame class must implement the ActionListener interface.
That's rather easy: it should implement the actionPerformed function:


     public class PlayGame implements ActionListener {

         
          public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent evt) {
          }


     }
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LVL 37

Assisted Solution

by:zzynx
zzynx earned 150 total points
ID: 12158171
You can of course use a new class for the ActionListener:

public class MyActionListener implements ActionListener {
    public MyActionListener() {
    }

    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent evt) {
       // Do your stuff
    }
}

that way you can write:

public class PlayGame {

   private MyActionListener myActionListener = new MyActionListener();


   ...
   mineButton[i].addActionListener( myActionListener );   // line 00
   ...
}
0
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LVL 9

Accepted Solution

by:
OBCT earned 150 total points
ID: 12158274
Another way would be to have an anonymous inner class. This way wouldn't necessarily be any easier or harder; however it’s just another option.

I would personally write a method to return your actionListener like so...

private ActionListener getActionListener()
{
    return new ActionListener()
    {
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e)
        {
            // process actions here
        }
    };
}

This way you would have full access to all private members and methods within your class and remove the need for constructing an instance of a separate class.

At the end of the day, there’s heaps of ways you can do this, so just pick your favourite ;-)
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Expert Comment

by:zzynx
ID: 12177161
Thanks
0
 
LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:OBCT
ID: 12179465
:-)
0

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