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Pro*C structure of structures

Posted on 2004-09-27
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Last Modified: 2012-08-13
In pro*c (or ansi C also - I guess its the same answer) can I have a structure of structures.

Something like this:

typedef struct outer_
{
   int       error;                  /* was there an error? TRUE/FALSE                       */
   char      debug[12];              /* Placeholder for debug code                           */
   int       intdebug;               /* Placeholder for integer debug code                   */

   char      CustomerRef[STR20];
   char      ActualBillDate[STR20];

   typedef struct inner_
   {
      int       error;                  /* was there an error? TRUE/FALSE                       */
      char    debug[12];              /* Placeholder for debug code                           */
      int       intdebug;               /* Placeholder for integer debug code                   */

      char      AccountNum[11+1];   /* Account Number                                       */
      char      InvoiceNum[STR20];   /* Invoice number to which a payment has been allocated */
      char      PaymentDate[STR20];  /* Date of Payment                                      */
      int        PaymentAmount[1];       /* Amount of Payment                                    */
   } inner_t;

  } outer_t;

If so, how do I reference the inner elements?
If not, is there another way?

Julian
0
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Question by:stummj
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6 Comments
 
LVL 22

Expert Comment

by:earth man2
ID: 12165187
this is why C++ introduces inheritance.  easy to do in c++ use class instead of struct.

typedef struct a {int x} a_t;
typedef struct b { char y[25]; a_t z; } b_t;

b_t h;

printf( "%d\n", h.z.x );
0
 

Author Comment

by:stummj
ID: 12167284
I'm not being facicious, but I'm not clear whether you are saying it cant be done in C or Pro*C or you dont know or what?
0
 
LVL 9

Accepted Solution

by:
pratikroy earned 250 total points
ID: 12167410
Declare the inner struct as :

typedef struct inner_
{
      int       error;                  /* was there an error? TRUE/FALSE                       */
      char    debug[12];              /* Placeholder for debug code                           */
      int       intdebug;               /* Placeholder for integer debug code                   */

      char      AccountNum[11+1];   /* Account Number                                       */
      char      InvoiceNum[STR20];   /* Invoice number to which a payment has been allocated */
      char      PaymentDate[STR20];  /* Date of Payment                                      */
      int        PaymentAmount[1];       /* Amount of Payment                                    */
} inner_t;

Then have an attribute in the outer struct (with the type of the struct above) :
typedef struct outer_
{
   int       error;                  /* was there an error? TRUE/FALSE                       */
   char      debug[12];              /* Placeholder for debug code                           */
   int       intdebug;               /* Placeholder for integer debug code                   */

   char      CustomerRef[STR20];
   char      ActualBillDate[STR20];

   inner_t * inner_var;

} outer_t;

You will declare a variable as :

outer_t        *outer_buffer;

And refer to the inner item by referring to :
outer_buffer->inner_var.error

Hope this helps.


0
 
LVL 22

Assisted Solution

by:earth man2
earth man2 earned 250 total points
ID: 12167705
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
typedef struct a {int x;} a_t;
typedef struct b { char y[25]; a_t z; } b_t;

int main ( int argc, char *argv[] ){
b_t h;
h.z.x = 3145926;
printf( "%d\n", h.z.x );
exit(0);
}

you define two typedefs.  The second struct b_t contains struct member z which is of type struct a_t.
To get at struct a_t member x you must use x.  So if we define variable h, x is denoted by h.z.x

Using c++ you can define class that inherits other class(es).  In that way you don't need that annoying z intermediate reference to z.
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
class a { public: int x; };
class b : a { char y[25]; public: a::x; };
int main ( int argc, char *argv[] ){
b h;
h.x = 2718;
printf( "%d\n", h.x );
exit(0);
}
0

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