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Console Commands from Windows App

The following code runs when I press a command button in a Windows App:

System.Diagnostics.Process process = new System.Diagnostics.Process();
process.StartInfo.FileName = "cmd";
process.StartInfo.Arguments = "/c nbtstat -a COMPUTERNAME";
process.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
process.Start();

When the console opens it quickly executes the "nbtstat -a computer" command and then disappears.  How do I keep that console window open to see the return results of the nbtstat command, and then close it on a keypress?  Something like, getch() in C++ I'd guess....?

Regards,
Tony
0
fattumsdad
Asked:
fattumsdad
  • 2
2 Solutions
 
drichardsCommented:
Tell the console to pause:

process.StartInfo.Arguments = "/c nbtstat -a COMPUTERNAME & pause";
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CallandorCommented:
You can use Console.ReadLine() to get input.
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eternal_21Commented:
drichards has an excellent suggestion.  You could also do this:

  System.Diagnostics.Process process = new System.Diagnostics.Process();
  process.StartInfo.FileName = "cmd";
  process.StartInfo.Arguments = "/c nbtstat -a COMPUTERNAME";
  process.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
  process.StartInfo.CreateNoWindow = true;
  process.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
  process.Start();
  string processOutput = process.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd();

process.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd() will wait until the process finishes, and then processOutput will contain everything that would have been printed to the console window.  Then you can use it however you like in your application:

  System.Windows.Forms.MessageBox.Show(processOutput.Replace("\r\r\n", Environment.NewLine));
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eternal_21Commented:
If you don't like the console window, you can always create your own:

    static System.Windows.Forms.Form GetOutputForm(string command)
    {
      System.Diagnostics.Process process = new System.Diagnostics.Process();
      process.StartInfo.FileName = "cmd";
      process.StartInfo.Arguments = "/c " + command;
      process.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
      process.StartInfo.CreateNoWindow = true;
      process.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
      process.Start();

      string processOutput = process.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd();

      System.Windows.Forms.Form outputForm = new System.Windows.Forms.Form();
      outputForm.Text = "Console Output";
      outputForm.Size = new System.Drawing.Size(640, 480);

      System.Windows.Forms.TextBox textBox = new System.Windows.Forms.TextBox();
      textBox.Text = processOutput.Replace("\r\r\n", Environment.NewLine).Trim();
      textBox.BackColor = System.Drawing.Color.Black;
      textBox.ForeColor = System.Drawing.Color.Lime;
      textBox.Font = new System.Drawing.Font("Courier New", 8f);
      textBox.Dock = System.Windows.Forms.DockStyle.Fill;
      textBox.Multiline = true;
      textBox.ScrollBars = System.Windows.Forms.ScrollBars.Vertical;

      textBox.Select(textBox.Text.Length, 0);
     
      outputForm.Controls.Add(textBox);

      return outputForm;
    }

And then you can do:

  GetOutputForm("net send * Hello World!").ShowDialog();

or

  GetOutputForm("nbtstat -a COMPUTERNAME").ShowDialog();

or even,

  GetOutputForm("nbtstat -a COMPUTERNAME");
  to execute the process but forget about the output.
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