Solved

check string for numbers

Posted on 2004-09-28
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Last Modified: 2010-04-05
I have a written a DLL which returns strings and integers from string. I am having a problem whereby if the string does not contain a valid number the real type conversion fails. What I need is a if else statement that checks there is a valid number.

Function lenofcall(S1,S2 : String) :Real;

Begin
Result := (StrToFloat(copy(S1,1,2))*60)+(StrToFloat(copy(S1,4,2)));
end

 for instance the following text would give a result of 129
S1 := '01:59'

but if
S1 := '----' or any other non number text,
then I want the result to give a result of '0'

any Ideas


0
Comment
Question by:lloydie-t
  • 4
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  • 2
  • +1
10 Comments
 
LVL 22

Expert Comment

by:Ferruccio Accalai
Comment Utility
just put it in a try except...

Function lenofcall(S1,S2 : String) :Real;
Begin
   try
      Result := (StrToFloat(copy(S1,1,2))*60)+(StrToFloat(copy(S1,4,2)));
   except
      Result := 0;
   end;
end;
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:Balshe
Comment Utility
HI
Try this

Function String_TO_REAL(STR:STRING):Real;
Const Number_Str='0123456789.';
Var
  Alpha:String;
  i:Integer;
Begin
  for i :=0 to length(Str) do
    Begin
      if pos(str[i],Number_Str)>0 then
       Alpha:=Alpha+str[i];
    end;
  Result:=StrToFloat(Alpha);
end;
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:Balshe
Comment Utility

Function String_TO_REAL(STR:STRING):Real;
Const Number_Str='0123456789.';
Var
  Alpha:String;
  i:Integer;
Begin
  for i :=1 to length(Str) do               // start from 1 not from 0
    Begin
      if pos(str[i],Number_Str)>0 then
       Alpha:=Alpha+str[i];
    end;
  Result:=StrToFloat(Alpha);
end;
0
 
LVL 17

Expert Comment

by:Wim ten Brink
Comment Utility
For those who haven't noticed this: lloydie-t wants to convert a string containing a time to a number of minutes. So:

var
  Hour, Min, Sec, MSec: Word;
begin
  DecodeTime( StrToTime( '01:59' ), Hour, Min, Sec, MSec );
  Result := Hour * 60 + Min;
end;

And the result is 119, not 129... ;-)
0
 
LVL 17

Accepted Solution

by:
Wim ten Brink earned 125 total points
Comment Utility
Oh, and since we want to result 0 if we don't have a valid time:

var
  Hour, Min, Sec, MSec: Word;
begin
  try
    DecodeTime( StrToTime( '01:59' ), Hour, Min, Sec, MSec );
    Result := Hour * 60 + Min;
  except Result := 0;
  end;
end;

Life isn't difficult if you think logical.
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Author Comment

by:lloydie-t
Comment Utility
Nearly there Alex, I have tried your code, but it does raise an excption when the string is not in a time format
FI: |SBNode is not a valid time.

this is the code I'm using

Function LenOfCall (S1,S2: String): Real; stdcall;
var
Hour, Min, Sec, Msec:Word;
Begin
        try
        DecodeTime(strToTime(copy(S1,50,8)),Hour,Min,Sec,Msec);
        Result := Hour*60+Min+Sec/60;
        except
        Result := 0;
        end;
end;

but it is much neater. Any other ideas


0
 

Author Comment

by:lloydie-t
Comment Utility
Seems as though the debugger is working overtime. The exception is raised only when running the app in delphi, running it stand alone does'nt seem to cause a problem.
0
 
LVL 17

Expert Comment

by:Wim ten Brink
Comment Utility
That might be related to the locale settings, the date-time separator. :-) But you could just use: S1[3] := ':';
And then use my solution to convert it.

Oh, and why: strToTime(copy(S1,50,8)) ???
You're copying 8 characters but the time would just be 5 characters. Maybe use: strToTime(copy(S1,50,5))
0
 

Author Comment

by:lloydie-t
Comment Utility
The exception only happens when I receive a string such as '----------' or '|SBNode'. I read somewhere that the debugger can sometimes pick these up even when using 'try except'. Otherwise It seems to work OK and as expected, when not running in delphi using the same data.

Thanks fro your help.
0
 
LVL 17

Expert Comment

by:Wim ten Brink
Comment Utility
Ehm, yes. The debugger picks up exceptions if you've set it up like that in de debug options under the Tools menu. Then the debugger stops at the exception, but if you press F9 it will just let the application handle it further. You'd have to turn that "Break on exception" option off if you don't want that.
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